Stanched
Stanch Stanch (st[.a]nch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stanched} (st[.a]ncht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stanching}.] [OF. estanchier, F. ['e]tancher to stop a liquid from flowing; akin to Pr., Sp., & Pg. estancar, It. stancare to weary, LL. stancare, stagnare, to stanch, fr. L. stagnare to be or make stagnant. See {Stagnate}.] 1. To stop the flowing of, as blood; to check; also, to stop the flowing of blood from; as, to stanch a wound. [Written also {staunch}.] [1913 Webster]

Iron or a stone laid to the neck doth stanch the bleeding of the nose. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

2. To extinguish; to quench, as fire or thirst. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • stanched — stɑːntʃ v. stop the flow of a liquid; cause a wound to stop bleeding (also staunch) adj. loyal, steadfast; strong, solid, sturdy (also staunch) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Application — Ap pli*ca tion, n. [L. applicatio, fr. applicare: cf. F. application. See {Apply}.] 1. The act of applying or laying on, in a literal sense; as, the application of emollients to a diseased limb. [1913 Webster] 2. The thing applied. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Repercussive — Re per*cuss ive ( k?s ?v), a. [Cf. F. r[ e]percussif.] [1913 Webster] 1. Tending or able to repercuss; having the power of sending back; causing to reverberate. [1913 Webster] Ye repercussive rocks! repeat the sound. W. Pattison. [1913 Webster] 2 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stanch — (st[.a]nch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stanched} (st[.a]ncht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stanching}.] [OF. estanchier, F. [ e]tancher to stop a liquid from flowing; akin to Pr., Sp., & Pg. estancar, It. stancare to weary, LL. stancare, stagnare, to stanch, fr …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stanch — Stanch, v. i. To cease, as the flowing of blood. [1913 Webster] Immediately her issue of blood stanched. Luke viii. 44. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stanching — Stanch Stanch (st[.a]nch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stanched} (st[.a]ncht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stanching}.] [OF. estanchier, F. [ e]tancher to stop a liquid from flowing; akin to Pr., Sp., & Pg. estancar, It. stancare to weary, LL. stancare, stagnare,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stanchless — Stanch less (st[.a]nch l[e^]s), a. 1. Incapable of being stanched, or stopped. [1913 Webster] 2. Unquenchable; insatiable. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • staunch — Stanch Stanch (st[.a]nch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stanched} (st[.a]ncht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stanching}.] [OF. estanchier, F. [ e]tancher to stop a liquid from flowing; akin to Pr., Sp., & Pg. estancar, It. stancare to weary, LL. stancare, stagnare,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • stanch — I. transitive verb or staunch Etymology: Middle English staunchen, from Anglo French estancher, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *stanticare, from Latin stant , stans, present participle Date: 14th century 1. to check or stop the flowing of < stanched… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • stem — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English stefn, stemn stem of a plant or ship; akin to Old High German stam plant stem and probably to Greek stamnos wine jar, histanai to set more at stand Date: before 12th century 1. a. the main trunk …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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