Staining
Stain Stain (st[=a]n), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stained} (st[=a]nd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Staining}.] [Abbrev. fr. distain.] 1. To discolor by the application of foreign matter; to make foul; to spot; as, to stain the hand with dye; armor stained with blood. [1913 Webster]

2. To color, as wood, glass, paper, cloth, or the like, by processes affecting, chemically or otherwise, the material itself; to tinge with a color or colors combining with, or penetrating, the substance; to dye; as, to stain wood with acids, colored washes, paint rubbed in, etc.; to stain glass. [1913 Webster]

3. To spot with guilt or infamy; to bring reproach on; to blot; to soil; to tarnish. [1913 Webster]

Of honor void, Of innocence, of faith, of purity, Our wonted ornaments now soiled and stained. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

4. To cause to seem inferior or soiled by comparison. [1913 Webster]

She stains the ripest virgins of her age. --Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster]

That did all other beasts in beauty stain. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

{Stained glass}, glass colored or stained by certain metallic pigments fused into its substance, -- often used for making ornamental windows. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To paint; dye; blot; soil; sully; discolor; disgrace; taint.

Usage: {Paint}, {Stain}, {Dye}. These denote three different processes; the first mechanical, the other two, chiefly chemical. To paint a thing is to spread a coat of coloring matter over it; to stain or dye a thing is to impart color to its substance. To stain is said chiefly of solids, as wood, glass, paper; to dye, of fibrous substances, textile fabrics, etc.; the one, commonly, a simple process, as applying a wash; the other more complex, as fixing colors by mordants. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Staining — is an auxiliary technique used in microscopy to enhance contrast in the microscopic image.In biochemistry it involves adding a class specific (DNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates) dye to a substrate to qualify or quantify the presence of a… …   Wikipedia

  • staining — staining. См. окрашивание. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • Staining — This unusual name is of Anglo Saxon origin, and is a variant form of the locational surname Staining , which derives from the place so called in Lancashire. The placename is first recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Staininghe , and in 1211… …   Surnames reference

  • staining — 1. The act of applying a stain. SEE ALSO: stain. 2. In dentistry, modification of the color of the tooth or denture base. progressive s. a procedure in which s. is continued until the desired …   Medical dictionary

  • staining — non·staining; …   English syllables

  • staining — noun 1. (histology) the use of a dye to color specimens for microscopic study (Freq. 23) • Derivationally related forms: ↑stain • Topics: ↑histology • Hypernyms: ↑dyeing …   Useful english dictionary

  • staining — Synonyms and related words: calcimining, coating, color printing, coloration, coloring, covering, dyeing, emblazonry, enameling, fresco, gilding, glazing, glossing, illumination, japanning, lithography, painting, pigmentation, priming,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • staining — steɪn n. discoloration, smudge, spot; liquid substance used as a coloring agent (on wood, etc.); taint or blemish on one s reputation v. discolor, smudge, spot; color by applying stain; taint or blemish someone s reputation …   English contemporary dictionary

  • staining —    bleeding    Medical jargon, from the seepage of blood through a bandage …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • Staining, Lancashire — Newton, Fylde redirects here. For the village near Preston, see Newton with Scales. Coordinates: 53°49′02″N 2°59′29″W / 53.8172°N 2.9915°W …   Wikipedia

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