Stadium Sta"di*um (st[=a]"d[i^]*[u^]m), n.; pl. {Stadia} (st[=a]"d[i^]*[.a]). [L., a stadium (in sense 1), from Gr. sta`dion.] 1. A Greek measure of length, being the chief one used for itinerary distances, also adopted by the Romans for nautical and astronomical measurements. It was equal to 600 Greek or 625 Roman feet, or 125 Roman paces, or to 606 feet 9 inches English. This was also called the {Olympic stadium}, as being the exact length of the foot-race course at Olympia. --Dr. W. Smith. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence: A race course; especially, the Olympic course for foot races. [1913 Webster]

3. Hence: A modern structure, with its inclosure, resembling the ancient stadium[2], used for athletic games which are typically played out-of-doors; such stadiums are usually large structures without roofs, though some modern stadiums may have a protective dome overhead. It may be contrasted with the {arena}, the term commonly used for smaller structures at which indoor games are played. [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

4. A kind of telemeter for measuring the distance of an object of known dimensions, by observing the angle it subtends; especially (Surveying), a graduated rod used to measure the distance of the place where it stands from an instrument having a telescope, by observing the number of the graduations of the rod that are seen between certain parallel wires (stadia wires) in the field of view of the telescope; -- also called {stadia}, and {stadia rod}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Stadium — Sn Lage, Entwicklungsabschnitt erw. fach. (18. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus l. stadium Laufbahn, Rennbahn, Sportstätte , dieses aus gr. stádion. Schon im Lateinischen auch als Wegstrecke, Abschnitt , im Deutschen dann besonders als… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • stadium — (n.) late 14c., a foot race, an ancient measure of length, from L. stadium a measure of length, a race course (commonly one eighth of a Roman mile; translated in early English Bibles by furlong), from Gk. stadion a measure of length, a running… …   Etymology dictionary

  • stadium — {{/stl 13}}{{stl 8}}rz. n V, lm M. stadiumdia {{/stl 8}}{{stl 7}} możliwa do wyodrębnienia część jakiegoś procesu, faza rozwojowa, stan przejściowy czegoś : {{/stl 7}}{{stl 10}}Stadium przejściowe rozwoju. Wejść w stadium. <łac. z gr.>… …   Langenscheidt Polski wyjaśnień

  • stadium — [stā′dē əm] n. pl. stadia; also, and for STADIUM sense 2 usually, stadiums [stā′dē ə] [ME < L < Gr stadion, fixed standard of length, altered (infl. by stadios, standing) < earlier spadion < span, to draw, pull: see SPAN1] 1. in… …   English World dictionary

  • Stadium — Stadium; stadium; …   English syllables

  • Stadium — [Aufbauwortschatz (Rating 1500 3200)] Auch: • Stufe • Phase Bsp.: • Die Forschung befand sich noch in einem frühen Stadium …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Stadĭum — (lat., v. gr. Stadion), 1) Längenmaß in Griechenland = 569 Pariser Fuß = 1/40 geographische Meile. Dieses war die Länge des in Griechenland allgemein angenommenen S. Daneben soll es noch mehre von verschiedener Länge gegeben haben u. von dem… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Stadĭum — (griech. Stadion), bei den Griechen die Bahn für Wettläufer mit einer seit alters feststehenden Länge von 600 Fuß und der Wettlauf selbst sowie das der Rennbahn entlehnte größte Längenmaß, bei der örtlichen Verschiedenheit des Fußes von… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Stadium — Stadĭum (grch. Stadion), die altgriech. Rennbahn für gymnastische Wettkämpfe; dann Wegemaß: das ägineisch attische (gemeingriech.) S. zu 500 Fuß (164 m), das olympische zu 600 Fuß (192 m), das griech. röm. zu 600 Fuß (178 m), das röm. zu 625 Fuß… …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Stadium — Stadium, ursprünglich die Rennbahn für den Wettlauf, altgriech. Längenmaß = 600 griech. od. = 625 röm. Fußen; 40 Stadien = 1 geographische Meile …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”