stadia rod
Stadium Sta"di*um (st[=a]"d[i^]*[u^]m), n.; pl. {Stadia} (st[=a]"d[i^]*[.a]). [L., a stadium (in sense 1), from Gr. sta`dion.] 1. A Greek measure of length, being the chief one used for itinerary distances, also adopted by the Romans for nautical and astronomical measurements. It was equal to 600 Greek or 625 Roman feet, or 125 Roman paces, or to 606 feet 9 inches English. This was also called the {Olympic stadium}, as being the exact length of the foot-race course at Olympia. --Dr. W. Smith. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence: A race course; especially, the Olympic course for foot races. [1913 Webster]

3. Hence: A modern structure, with its inclosure, resembling the ancient stadium[2], used for athletic games which are typically played out-of-doors; such stadiums are usually large structures without roofs, though some modern stadiums may have a protective dome overhead. It may be contrasted with the {arena}, the term commonly used for smaller structures at which indoor games are played. [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

4. A kind of telemeter for measuring the distance of an object of known dimensions, by observing the angle it subtends; especially (Surveying), a graduated rod used to measure the distance of the place where it stands from an instrument having a telescope, by observing the number of the graduations of the rod that are seen between certain parallel wires (stadia wires) in the field of view of the telescope; -- also called {stadia}, and {stadia rod}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • stadia rod — noun : a graduated rod used with an instrument having stadia hairs to measure the distance from the observation point to the place where the rod is positioned by observation of the length of rod subtended by the distance between the stadia hairs… …   Useful english dictionary

  • stadia rod — Survey. rod (def. 19). * * * …   Universalium

  • Stadia mark — Stadia marks, also called stadia lines or stadia hairs, are crosshairs on the reticle of a theodolite or other surveying instrument that allow stadiametric rangefinding.EtymologyThe term stadia mark derives from the obsolete unit of distance, the …   Wikipedia

  • stadia — stadia1 [stā′dē ə] n. [It, prob. < L, pl. of stadium: see STADIUM] a method of surveying in which distances and elevations are obtained by observing the interval on a graduated, upright rod (stadia rod) intercepted by two parallel horizontal… …   English World dictionary

  • Stadia — can refer to * The plural of stadium. * Stadia rod, a surveyors instrument. * Stadia (length), an ancient unit of distance …   Wikipedia

  • Stadia — Stadium Sta di*um (st[=a] d[i^]*[u^]m), n.; pl. {Stadia} (st[=a] d[i^]*[.a]). [L., a stadium (in sense 1), from Gr. sta dion.] 1. A Greek measure of length, being the chief one used for itinerary distances, also adopted by the Romans for nautical …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • stadia — Stadium Sta di*um (st[=a] d[i^]*[u^]m), n.; pl. {Stadia} (st[=a] d[i^]*[.a]). [L., a stadium (in sense 1), from Gr. sta dion.] 1. A Greek measure of length, being the chief one used for itinerary distances, also adopted by the Romans for nautical …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • stadia — I. /ˈsteɪdiə/ (say staydeeuh) noun 1. a method of surveying in which distances are read by noting the interval on a graduated rod (stadia rod) intercepted by two parallel crosshairs (stadia hairs or stadia wires) mounted in the telescope of a… …   Australian English dictionary

  • rod — rodless, adj. rodlike, adj. /rod/, n., v., rodded, rodding. n. 1. a stick, wand, staff, or the like, of wood, metal, or other material. 2. a straight, slender shoot or stem of any woody plant, whether still growing or cut from the plant. 3. See… …   Universalium

  • stadia — stadia1 /stay dee euh/, n. 1. a method of surveying in which distances are read by noting the interval on a graduated rod intercepted by two parallel cross hairs (stadia hairs or stadia wires) mounted in the telescope of a surveying instrument,… …   Universalium

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