Squalled
Squall Squall, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Squalled} (skw[add]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Squalling}.] [Icel. skvala. Cf. {Squeal}.] To cry out; to scream or cry violently, as a woman frightened, or a child in anger or distress; as, the infant squalled. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • squalled — skwɔːl n. sudden powerful storm accompanied by heavy snow or rain; scream, shout v. shout, scream; blow suddenly and powerfully …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Squall — Squall, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Squalled} (skw[add]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Squalling}.] [Icel. skvala. Cf. {Squeal}.] To cry out; to scream or cry violently, as a woman frightened, or a child in anger or distress; as, the infant squalled. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Squalling — Squall Squall, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Squalled} (skw[add]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Squalling}.] [Icel. skvala. Cf. {Squeal}.] To cry out; to scream or cry violently, as a woman frightened, or a child in anger or distress; as, the infant squalled. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • squall — I UK [skwɔːl] / US [skwɔl] noun [countable] Word forms squall : singular squall plural squalls a storm that happens suddenly, especially at sea II UK [skwɔːl] / US [skwɔl] verb [intransitive] Word forms squall : present tense I/you/we/they squall …   English dictionary

  • Tornadoes of 2006 — Infobox Tornado Year|name=Tornadoes of 2006 image location=Tornado Leseur 24.jpg date=January December 2006 fujitascale=F4 location=Monroe City, Missouri and Crosstown, Missouri max date=March 12 and September 22 tornadoes=1,106 total da USD)… …   Wikipedia

  • Hymnody and Hymnology — • Hymnody means exactly hymn song , but as the hymn singer as well as the hymn poet are included under (hymnodos), so we also include under hymnody the hymnal verse or religious lyric. Hymnology is the science of hymnody or the historico… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • squall — {{11}}squall (n.) sudden, violent gust of wind, 1719, originally nautical, probably from a Scandinavian source (Cf. Norw. skval sudden rush of water, Swed. skvala to gush, pour down ), probably ultimately a derivative of SQUALL (Cf. squall) (v.) …   Etymology dictionary

  • squall — [[t]skwɔ͟ːl[/t]] squalls, squalling, squalled 1) N COUNT A squall is a sudden strong wind which often causes a brief, violent rain storm or snow storm. The boat was hit by a squall north of the island. Syn: storm 2) VERB If a person or animal… …   English dictionary

  • bonfires —    Throughout recorded history, it has taken very little persuasion to get English people to make a bonfire. Not only do fires appear regularly as an integral part of certain *calendar customs such as *November the Fifth, *Queen Elizabeth I s… …   A Dictionary of English folklore

  • cats —    Beliefs concerning cats, especially *black ones, are numerous and often contradictory (Opie and Tatem, 1989: 57 62, 241). On the whole, black cats are lucky in England, and therefore appear on greetings cards and as *charms; however,… …   A Dictionary of English folklore

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