Sponged
Sponge Sponge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sponged} (sp[u^]njd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sponging} (sp[u^]n"j[i^]ng).] 1. To cleanse or wipe with a sponge; as, to sponge a slate or a cannon; to wet with a sponge; as, to sponge cloth. [1913 Webster]

2. To wipe out with a sponge, as letters or writing; to efface; to destroy all trace of. --Hooker. [1913 Webster]

3. Fig.: To deprive of something by imposition. ``How came such multitudes of our nation . . . to be sponged of their plate and their money?'' --South. [1913 Webster]

4. Fig.: To get by imposition or mean arts without cost; as, to sponge a breakfast. --Swift. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • sponged — mod. thirsty. □ I gotta get a drink, man. I’m sponged! …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • sponged — spÊŒndÊ’ n. aquatic animal with a porous outer body and a rigid or elastic skeleton; skeleton of a sponge; piece of flexible and absorbent plastic or rubber used for cleaning; one or that which absorbs; sponger v. clean with a sponge; wipe with a …   English contemporary dictionary

  • sponged — …   Useful english dictionary

  • sponged ware — spongeware. * * * …   Universalium

  • sponged ware — spongeware …   Useful english dictionary

  • sponge — spongeless, adj. spongelike, adj. spongingly, adv. /spunj/, n., v., sponged, sponging. n. 1. any aquatic, chiefly marine animal of the phylum Porifera, having a porous structure and usually a horny, siliceous or calcareous internal skeleton or… …   Universalium

  • Sponge — Sponge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sponged} (sp[u^]njd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sponging} (sp[u^]n j[i^]ng).] 1. To cleanse or wipe with a sponge; as, to sponge a slate or a cannon; to wet with a sponge; as, to sponge cloth. [1913 Webster] 2. To wipe out… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sponging — Sponge Sponge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sponged} (sp[u^]njd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sponging} (sp[u^]n j[i^]ng).] 1. To cleanse or wipe with a sponge; as, to sponge a slate or a cannon; to wet with a sponge; as, to sponge cloth. [1913 Webster] 2. To wipe… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sponge — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, from Latin spongia, from Greek Date: before 12th century 1. a. (1) an elastic porous mass of interlacing horny fibers that forms the internal skeleton of various marine animals (phylum… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • sponge — I n. spongy substance 1) to squeeze a sponge symbol of surrender 2) to throw in, toss in the sponge II v. (colloq. ) 1) (D; tr.) ( to wheedle ) to sponge from, off, off of (AE) (he sponged a cigarette from me) 2) (d; intr.) to sponge on ( to… …   Combinatory dictionary

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