Sphere Sphere, n. [OE. spere, OF. espere, F. sph[`e]re, L. sphaera,. Gr. ??? a sphere, a ball.] 1. (Geom.) A body or space contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point within called its center. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, any globe or globular body, especially a celestial one, as the sun, a planet, or the earth. [1913 Webster]

Of celestial bodies, first the sun, A mighty sphere, he framed. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. (Astron.) (a) The apparent surface of the heavens, which is assumed to be spherical and everywhere equally distant, in which the heavenly bodies appear to have their places, and on which the various astronomical circles, as of right ascension and declination, the equator, ecliptic, etc., are conceived to be drawn; an ideal geometrical sphere, with the astronomical and geographical circles in their proper positions on it. (b) In ancient astronomy, one of the concentric and eccentric revolving spherical transparent shells in which the stars, sun, planets, and moon were supposed to be set, and by which they were carried, in such a manner as to produce their apparent motions. [1913 Webster]

4. (Logic) The extension of a general conception, or the totality of the individuals or species to which it may be applied. [1913 Webster]

5. Circuit or range of action, knowledge, or influence; compass; province; employment; place of existence. [1913 Webster]

To be called into a huge sphere, and not to be seen to move in 't. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Taking her out of the ordinary relations with humanity, and inclosing her in a sphere by herself. --Hawthorne. [1913 Webster]

Each in his hidden sphere of joy or woe Our hermit spirits dwell. --Keble. [1913 Webster]

6. Rank; order of society; social positions. [1913 Webster]

7. An orbit, as of a star; a socket. [R.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Armillary sphere}, {Crystalline sphere}, {Oblique sphere},. See under {Armillary}, {Crystalline},.

{Doctrine of the sphere}, applications of the principles of spherical trigonometry to the properties and relations of the circles of the sphere, and the problems connected with them, in astronomy and geography, as to the latitudes and longitudes, distance and bearing, of places on the earth, and the right ascension and declination, altitude and azimuth, rising and setting, etc., of the heavenly bodies; spherical geometry.

{Music of the spheres}. See under {Music}. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Globe; orb; circle. See {Globe}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • sphère — [ sfɛr ] n. f. • 1509; espere mil. XIIe; d ab. t. d astron.; lat. sphæra, gr. sphaira 1 ♦ Surface fermée dont tous les points sont situés à égale distance d un point donné; solide délimité par cette surface (⇒ 1. balle, 1. bille, boule). Centre,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Sphere — Sphère Pour les articles homonymes, voir Sphère (homonymie). Une sphère dans un espace euclidien En géométrie euclidienne, une sphère es …   Wikipédia en Français

  • sphere — SPHERE. s. f. Terme de Geometrie. Corps solide dont toutes les lignes tirées du centre à la circonference sont esgales. Sphere, se prend plus ordinairement pour Une espece de machine ronde & mobile, composée des divers cercles qui representent… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • -sphère — ⇒ SPHÈRE, élém. formant Élém. tiré du subst. fr. sphère, entrant dans la constr. de subst. fém., plus rarement masc. A. GÉOPHYS., ASTRON. [Sur le modèle de atmosphère; les mots constr. désignent des couches de la sphère terrestre ou de son… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • sphere — [sfıə US sfır] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: espere, from Latin sphaera, from Greek sphaira ball, sphere ] 1.) a ball shape 2.) a particular area of activity, work, knowledge etc in ... sphere ▪ television s increasing role in the… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • sphere — [ sfır ] noun count ** 1. ) an object that is round like a ball 2. ) a particular area of interest, activity, work, etc. that is one of many parts of life: the financial/political/scientific etc. sphere: Let s take this debate out of the… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • sphere — [sfir] n. [ME spere < OFr espere < L sphaera < Gr sphaira] 1. any round body or figure having the surface equally distant from the center at all points; globe; ball 2. a star, planet, etc. 3. the visible heavens; sky 4. short for… …   English World dictionary

  • Sphere — Sphere, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sphered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sphering}.] 1. To place in a sphere, or among the spheres; to insphere. [1913 Webster] The glorious planet Sol In noble eminence enthroned and sphered Amidst the other. Shak. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sphere — (n.) 1530s, restored spelling of M.E. spere (c.1300) space, conceived as a hollow globe about the world, from O.Fr. espere (13c.), from L. sphæra globe, ball, celestial sphere, from Gk. sphaira globe, ball, of unknown origin. Sense of ball, body… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Sphere — – Die Gedanken des Bösen ist ein Roman des US amerikanischen Schriftstellers Michael Crichton aus dem Jahr 1987. Das Buch wurde 1997 unter dem Titel Sphere – Die Macht aus dem All von Barry Levinson verfilmt. Handlung Der Psychologe Dr. Norman… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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