Span blocks
Span Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp["o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, a small space or a brief portion of time. [1913 Webster]

Yet not to earth's contracted span Thy goodness let me bound. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Life's but a span; I'll every inch enjoy. --Farquhar. [1913 Webster]

3. The spread or extent of an arch between its abutments, or of a beam, girder, truss, roof, bridge, or the like, between its supports. [1913 Webster]

4. (Naut.) A rope having its ends made fast so that a purchase can be hooked to the bight; also, a rope made fast in the center so that both ends can be used. [1913 Webster]

5. [Cf. D. span, Sw. spann, Dan. sp[ae]nd, G. gespann. See {Span}, v. t. ] A pair of horses or other animals driven together; usually, such a pair of horses when similar in color, form, and action. [1913 Webster]

{Span blocks} (Naut.), blocks at the topmast and topgallant-mast heads, for the studding-sail halyards.

{Span counter}, an old English child's game, in which one throws a counter on the ground, and another tries to hit it with his counter, or to get his counter so near it that he can span the space between them, and touch both the counters. --Halliwell. ``Henry V., in whose time boys went to span counter for French crowns.'' --Shak.

{Span iron} (Naut.), a special kind of harpoon, usually secured just below the gunwale of a whaleboat.

{Span roof}, a common roof, having two slopes and one ridge, with eaves on both sides. --Gwilt.

{Span shackle} (Naut.), a large bolt driven through the forecastle deck, with a triangular shackle in the head to receive the heel of the old-fashioned fish davit. --Ham. Nav. Encyc. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • span blocks — noun Etymology: span (VI) : two blocks each at one end of a span of rope at a masthead for studding sail halyards …   Useful english dictionary

  • Span — Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp[ o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span counter — Span Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp[ o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span iron — Span Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp[ o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span roof — Span Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp[ o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span shackle — Span Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp[ o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span (programming language) — Span is a programming language targeting the Parrot virtual machine. Its syntax is meant to be very similar to C, but its philosophy is Smalltalk like, and it uses Smalltalk style message syntax. Almost all of Span s library visible to the user… …   Wikipedia

  • building construction — Techniques and industry involved in the assembly and erection of structures. Early humans built primarily for shelter, using simple methods. Building materials came from the land, and fabrication was dictated by the limits of the materials and… …   Universalium

  • harbours and sea works — Introduction harbour also spelled  harbor        any part of a body of water and the manmade structures surrounding it that sufficiently shelters a vessel from wind, waves, and currents, enabling safe anchorage or the discharge and loading of… …   Universalium

  • Life Sciences — ▪ 2009 Introduction Zoology       In 2008 several zoological studies provided new insights into how species life history traits (such as the timing of reproduction or the length of life of adult individuals) are derived in part as responses to… …   Universalium

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”