Span
Span Span, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Spanned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Spanning}.] [AS. pannan; akin to D. & G. spannen, OHG. spannan, Sw. sp["a]nna, Dan. sp[ae]nde, Icel. spenna, and perh. to Gr. ? to draw, to drag, L. spatium space. [root]170. Cf. {Spin}, v. t., {Space}, {Spasm}.] 1. To measure by the span of the hand with the fingers extended, or with the fingers encompassing the object; as, to span a space or distance; to span a cylinder. [1913 Webster]

My right hand hath spanned the heavens. --Isa. xiviii. 13. [1913 Webster]

2. To reach from one side of to the order; to stretch over as an arch. [1913 Webster]

The rivers were spanned by arches of solid masonry. --prescott. [1913 Webster]

3. To fetter, as a horse; to hobble. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Span — Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp[ o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span — may refer to length or space:* span (length), the width of a human hand * span (architecture) ** For powerlines, the distance between two pylons ** For aerial tramways, the distance between two supporting structures ** For a bridge, the distance… …   Wikipedia

  • Span — Span, v. i. To be matched, as horses. [U. S.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span — Span, archaic imp. & p. p. of {Spin}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span — Spin Spin (sp[i^]n), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Spun}(Archaic imp. {Span}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Spinning}.] [AS. spinnan; akin to D. & G. spinnen, Icel. & Sw. spinna, Dan. spinde, Goth. spinnan, and probably to E. span. [root]170. Cf. {Span}, v. t.,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • span — I. archaic past of spin II. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English spann; akin to Old High German spanna span, Middle Dutch spannen to stretch, hitch up Date: before 12th century 1. the distance from the end of the thumb to the end of… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Span-of-control — is a term originating in military organization theory, but now used more commonly in business management, particularly human resource management. Span of control refers to the number of subordinates a supervisor has.In the hierarchical business… …   Wikipedia

  • Span blocks — Span Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp[ o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span counter — Span Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp[ o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Span iron — Span Span, n. [AS. spann; akin to D. span, OHG. spanna, G. spanne, Icel. sp[ o]nn. [root]170. See {Span}, v. t. ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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