Some Some (s[u^]m), a. [OE. som, sum, AS. sum; akin to OS., OFries., & OHG. sum, OD. som, D. sommig, Icel. sumr, Dan. somme (pl.), Sw. somlige (pl.), Goth. sums, and E. same. [root]191. See {Same}, a., and cf. {-some}.] 1. Consisting of a greater or less portion or sum; composed of a quantity or number which is not stated; -- used to express an indefinite quantity or number; as, some wine; some water; some persons. Used also pronominally; as, I have some. [1913 Webster]

Some theoretical writers allege that there was a time when there was no such thing as society. --Blackstone. [1913 Webster]

2. A certain; one; -- indicating a person, thing, event, etc., as not known individually, or designated more specifically; as, some man, that is, some one man. ``Some brighter clime.'' --Mrs. Barbauld. [1913 Webster]

Some man praiseth his neighbor by a wicked intent. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Most gentlemen of property, at some period or other of their lives, are ambitious of representing their county in Parliament. --Blackstone. [1913 Webster]

3. Not much; a little; moderate; as, the censure was to some extent just. [1913 Webster]

4. About; near; more or less; -- used commonly with numerals, but formerly also with a singular substantive of time or distance; as, a village of some eighty houses; some two or three persons; some hour hence. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The number slain on the rebel's part were some two thousand. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

5. Considerable in number or quantity. ``Bore us some leagues to sea.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

On its outer point, some miles away. The lighthouse lifts its massive masonry. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster]

6. Certain; those of one part or portion; -- in distinction from {other} or {others}; as, some men believe one thing, and others another. [1913 Webster]

Some [seeds] fell among thorns; . . . but other fell into good ground. --Matt. xiii. 7, 8. [1913 Webster]

7. A part; a portion; -- used pronominally, and followed sometimes by of; as, some of our provisions. [1913 Webster]

Your edicts some reclaim from sins, But most your life and blest example wins. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

{All and some}, one and all. See under {All}, adv. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Note: The illiterate in the United States and Scotland often use some as an adverb, instead of somewhat, or an equivalent expression; as, I am some tired; he is some better; it rains some, etc. [1913 Webster]

{Some . . . some}, one part . . . another part; these . . . those; -- used distributively. [1913 Webster]

Some to the shores do fly, Some to the woods, or whither fear advised. --Daniel. [1913 Webster]

Note: Formerly used also of single persons or things: this one . . . that one; one . . . another. [1913 Webster]

Some in his bed, some in the deep sea. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • some — [ səm, strong sʌm ] function word, quantifier *** Some can be used in the following ways: as a determiner (followed by an uncountable noun): I ll make some coffee. (followed by a plural noun): She brought me some flowers. (followed by a singular… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • some — 1. The use of some to mean ‘very much’ or ‘notably such’ in sentences of the type. This is some party is still considered suitable mainly for informal contexts, and Churchill s famous line in a speech in 1941, Some chicken! Some neck! (in… …   Modern English usage

  • some — [sum] adj. [ME som < OE sum, a certain one, akin to Goth sums < IE * som > SAME] 1. being a certain one or ones not specified or known [open some evenings] 2. being of a certain unspecified (but often considerable) number, quantity,… …   English World dictionary

  • -some — ♦ Élément, du gr. sôma « corps » : centrosome, chromosome, ribosome. somato , some éléments, du gr. sôma, sômatos, corps . some V. somato . ⇒ SOME, élém. formant Élém. tiré du gr. , de « corps », entrant dans la constr. de termes sav. en biol. et …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • -some — as a suffix forming adjectives, it represents O.E. sum (see SOME (Cf. some); Cf. O.Fris. sum, Ger. sam, O.N. samr), related to sama same. As a suffix added to numerals meaning a group of that number (Cf. twosome) it represents O.E. sum some, used …   Etymology dictionary

  • Some — may refer to:*Some, a word denoting an indeterminate number of something: see Grammatical number* Some , a song by Built to Spill from their 1994 album There s Nothing Wrong with Love *Some Records, an US record label.*So Others Might Eat (SOME) …   Wikipedia

  • Some — Données clés Réalisation Chang Yoon hyun Scénario Kim Eun jeong Kim Eun shil Acteurs principaux Ko Soo Song Ji hyo Pays d’origine …   Wikipédia en Français

  • some — O.E. sum some, from P.Gmc. *sumas (Cf. O.S., O.Fris., O.H.G. sum, O.N. sumr, Goth. sums), from PIE root *sem one, as one (Cf. Skt. samah even, level, similar, identical; Gk. HAMO (Cf. hamo ); see SAME (Cf …   Etymology dictionary

  • -some — ( s[u^]m). [AS. sum; akin to G. & OHG. sam, Icel. samr, Goth. lustusams longed for. See {Same}, a., and cf. {Some}, a.] An adjective suffix having primarily the sense of like or same, and indicating a considerable degree of the thing or quality… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • -some — Ⅰ. some [1] ► SUFFIX forming adjectives meaning: 1) productive of: loathsome. 2) characterized by being: wholesome. 3) apt to: tiresome. ORIGIN Old English. Ⅱ. some …   English terms dictionary

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