Sneeze
Sneeze Sneeze, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Sneezed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sneezing}.] [OE. snesen; of uncertain origin; cf. D. snuse to sniff, E. neese, and AS. fne['o]san.] To emit air, chiefly through the nose, audibly and violently, by a kind of involuntary convulsive force, occasioned by irritation of the inner membrane of the nose. [1913 Webster]

{Not to be sneezed at}, not to be despised or contemned; not to be treated lightly. [Colloq.] ``He had to do with old women who were not to be sneezed at.'' --Prof. Wilson. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sneeze — Sneeze, n. A sudden and violent ejection of air with an audible sound, chiefly through the nose. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sneeze — sneeze; sneeze·less; …   English syllables

  • sneeze — ► VERB ▪ make a sudden involuntary expulsion of air from the nose and mouth due to irritation of one s nostrils. ► NOUN ▪ an act or the sound of sneezing. ● not to be sneezed at Cf. ↑not to be sneezed at DERIVATIVES sneezer noun …   English terms dictionary

  • sneeze — [snēz] vi. sneezed, sneezing [ME snesen, prob. echoic alteration of fnesen < OE fneosan: for IE base see PNEUMA] to exhale breath from the nose and mouth in a sudden, involuntary, explosive action, as a result of an irritation of the nasal… …   English World dictionary

  • Sneeze — A sneeze (or sternutation) is a semi autonomous, convulsive expulsion of air from the lungs, most commonly caused by foreign particles irritating the nasal mucosa. Sneezing can further be triggered through sudden exposure to bright light, a… …   Wikipedia

  • sneeze — {{11}}sneeze (n.) 1640s, from SNEEZE (Cf. sneeze) (v.). {{12}}sneeze (v.) O.E. fneosan to snort, sneeze, from P.Gmc. *fneusanan (Cf. M.Du. fniesen, Du. fniezen to sneeze; O.N. fnysa to snort; O.N. hnjosa, Swed. nysa to sneeze; O.H.G …   Etymology dictionary

  • sneeze — [15] The Old English word for ‘sneeze’ was fnēsan, a distant relative of Greek pneuma ‘breath’ (source of English pneumatic). This survived into Middle English as fnese. The letters f and s were very similar in medieval script, so it could have… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • sneeze — [15] The Old English word for ‘sneeze’ was fnēsan, a distant relative of Greek pneuma ‘breath’ (source of English pneumatic). This survived into Middle English as fnese. The letters f and s were very similar in medieval script, so it could have… …   Word origins

  • sneeze — sneeze1 [sni:z] v [: Old English; Origin: fneosan] 1.) if you sneeze, air suddenly comes from your nose, making a noise, for example when you have a cold ▪ She started coughing and sneezing. ▪ The dust was making him sneeze . 2.) not to be… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • sneeze — verb ADVERB ▪ loudly ▪ Someone sneezed loudly at the back of the hall. ▪ violently ▪ uncontrollably VERB + SNEEZE ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

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