Sneered
Sneer Sneer, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Sneered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sneering}.] [OE. sneren, Dan. sn?rre to snarl or grin (like a dog); cf. Prov. E. sneer to grin, sner to snort, snert to sneer at. See {Snore}, v. i.] 1. To show contempt by turning up the nose, or by a particular facial expression. [1913 Webster]

2. To inssinuate contempt by a covert expression; to speak derisively. [1913 Webster]

I could be content to be a little sneared at. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

3. To show mirth awkwardly. [R.] --Tatler. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To scoff; gibe; jeer.

Usage: {Sneer}, {Scoff}, {Jeer}. The verb to sneer implies to cast contempt indirectly or by covert expressions. To jeer is stronger, and denotes the use of several sarcastic reflections. To scoff is stronger still, implying the use of insolent mockery and derision. [1913 Webster]

And sneers as learnedly as they, Like females o'er their morning tea. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

Midas, exposed to all their jeers, Had lost his art, and kept his ears. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

The fop, with learning at defiance, Scoffs at the pedant and science. --Gay. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • sneered — snɪr /snɪə n. scornful look, contemptuous glance; expression of ridicule and mockery v. smile or look at in a scornful manner; express contempt for someone or something, mock, ridicule …   English contemporary dictionary

  • sneered at — ridiculed, mocked, derided …   English contemporary dictionary

  • sneer — [[t]snɪ͟ə(r)[/t]] sneers, sneering, sneered VERB If you sneer at someone or something, you express your contempt for them by the expression on your face or by what you say. [V at n] There is too great a readiness to sneer at anything the… …   English dictionary

  • sneer — I UK [snɪə(r)] / US [snɪr] verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms sneer : present tense I/you/we/they sneer he/she/it sneers present participle sneering past tense sneered past participle sneered to speak in an unpleasant way that shows you do …   English dictionary

  • Sneer — Sneer, v. t. 1. To utter with a grimace or contemptuous expression; to utter with a sneer; to say sneeringly; as, to sneer fulsome lies at a person. Congreve. [1913 Webster] A ship of fools, he sneered. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] 2. To treat with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sneer — sneer1 [snıə US snır] v [I and T] [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: Perhaps copying the action] to smile or speak in a very unkind way that shows you have no respect for someone or something ▪ Is that your best outfit? he sneered. sneer at ▪ She sneered… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • sneer´er — sneer «snihr», verb, noun. –v.i. to show scorn or contempt by looks or words: »The mean girls sneered at the poor girl s cheap clothes. Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering teach the rest to sneer (Alexander Pope) …   Useful english dictionary

  • come off it — also[get off it] {v. phr.}, {slang} Stop pretending; bragging, or kidding; stop being silly. Used as a command. * / So I said to the duchess... Jimmy began. Oh, come off it, the other boys sneered./ * /Fritz said he had a car of his own. Oh, come …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • come off it — also[get off it] {v. phr.}, {slang} Stop pretending; bragging, or kidding; stop being silly. Used as a command. * / So I said to the duchess... Jimmy began. Oh, come off it, the other boys sneered./ * /Fritz said he had a car of his own. Oh, come …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Sneer — Sneer, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Sneered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sneering}.] [OE. sneren, Dan. sn?rre to snarl or grin (like a dog); cf. Prov. E. sneer to grin, sner to snort, snert to sneer at. See {Snore}, v. i.] 1. To show contempt by turning up the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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