snake fence
Fence Fence (f[e^]ns), n. [Abbrev. from defence.] 1. That which fends off attack or danger; a defense; a protection; a cover; security; shield. [1913 Webster]

Let us be backed with God and with the seas, Which he hath given for fence impregnable. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

A fence betwixt us and the victor's wrath. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

2. An inclosure about a field or other space, or about any object; especially, an inclosing structure of wood, iron, or other material, intended to prevent intrusion from without or straying from within. [1913 Webster]

Leaps o'er the fence with ease into the fold. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Note: In England a hedge, ditch, or wall, as well as a structure of boards, palings, or rails, is called a fence. [1913 Webster]

3. (Locks) A projection on the bolt, which passes through the tumbler gates in locking and unlocking. [1913 Webster]

4. Self-defense by the use of the sword; the art and practice of fencing and sword play; hence, skill in debate and repartee. See {Fencing}. [1913 Webster]

Enjoy your dear wit, and gay rhetoric, That hath so well been taught her dazzing fence. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Of dauntless courage and consummate skill in fence. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

5. A receiver of stolen goods, or a place where they are received. [Slang] --Mayhew. [1913 Webster]

{Fence month} (Forest Law), the month in which female deer are fawning, when hunting is prohibited. --Bullokar.

{Fence roof}, a covering for defense. ``They fitted their shields close to one another in manner of a fence roof.'' --Holland.

{Fence time}, the breeding time of fish or game, when they should not be killed.

{Rail fence}, a fence made of rails, sometimes supported by posts.

{Ring fence}, a fence which encircles a large area, or a whole estate, within one inclosure.

{Worm fence}, a zigzag fence composed of rails crossing one another at their ends; -- called also {snake fence}, or {Virginia rail fence}.

{To be on the fence}, to be undecided or uncommitted in respect to two opposing parties or policies. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Snake fence — Snake Snake, n. [AS. snaca; akin to LG. snake, schnake, Icel. sn[=a]kr, sn?kr, Dan. snog, Sw. snok; of uncertain origin.] (Zo[ o]l.) Any species of the order Ophidia; an ophidian; a serpent, whether harmless or venomous. See {Ophidia}, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • snake fence — snake′ fence n. bui a fence, zigzag in plan, made of rails resting across one another at an angle • Etymology: 1795–1805, amer …   From formal English to slang

  • snake fence — ☆ snake fence n. VIRGINIA (RAIL) FENCE …   English World dictionary

  • snake fence — noun rail fence consisting of a zigzag of interlocking rails • Syn: ↑worm fence, ↑snake rail fence, ↑Virginia fence • Hypernyms: ↑rail fence * * * noun : worm fence * * * a fence, zigz …   Useful english dictionary

  • snake fence — a fence, zigzag in plan, made of rails resting across one another at an angle. Also called Virginia fence, Virginia rail fence, worm fence. [1795 1805, Amer.] * * * …   Universalium

  • snake fence — noun Date: 1805 worm fence …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • snake fence — /ˈsneɪk fɛns/ (say snayk fens) noun Chiefly US → worm fence …   Australian English dictionary

  • snake-fence — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Snake — Snake, n. [AS. snaca; akin to LG. snake, schnake, Icel. sn[=a]kr, sn?kr, Dan. snog, Sw. snok; of uncertain origin.] (Zo[ o]l.) Any species of the order Ophidia; an ophidian; a serpent, whether harmless or venomous. See {Ophidia}, and {Serpent}.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Snake eater — Snake Snake, n. [AS. snaca; akin to LG. snake, schnake, Icel. sn[=a]kr, sn?kr, Dan. snog, Sw. snok; of uncertain origin.] (Zo[ o]l.) Any species of the order Ophidia; an ophidian; a serpent, whether harmless or venomous. See {Ophidia}, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”