Sly boots
Boot Boot, n. [OE. bote, OF. bote, F. botte, LL. botta; of uncertain origin.] 1. A covering for the foot and lower part of the leg, ordinarily made of leather. [1913 Webster]

2. An instrument of torture for the leg, formerly used to extort confessions, particularly in Scotland. [1913 Webster]

So he was put to the torture, which in Scotland they call the boots; for they put a pair of iron boots close on the leg, and drive wedges between them and the leg. --Bp. Burnet. [1913 Webster]

3. A place at the side of a coach, where attendants rode; also, a low outside place before and behind the body of the coach. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

4. A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach. [1913 Webster]

5. An apron or cover (of leather or rubber cloth) for the driving seat of a vehicle, to protect from rain and mud. [1913 Webster]

6. (Plumbing) The metal casing and flange fitted about a pipe where it passes through a roof. [1913 Webster]

{Boot catcher}, the person at an inn whose business it was to pull off boots and clean them. [Obs.] --Swift.

{Boot closer}, one who, or that which, sews the uppers of boots.

{Boot crimp}, a frame or device used by bootmakers for drawing and shaping the body of a boot.

{Boot hook}, a hook with a handle, used for pulling on boots.

{Boots and saddles} (Cavalry Tactics), the trumpet call which is the first signal for mounted drill.

{Sly boots}. See {Slyboots}, in the Vocabulary. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • sly|boots — «SLY BOOTS», noun. a sly, cunning, or crafty person …   Useful english dictionary

  • sly-boots —    Applied to a cunning or sly person since the eighteenth century. It may originally have been insulting but in modern use is almost complimentary. Webster’s Dictionary interestingly explains it as a person ‘who is sly in an engaging way’. There …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • sly-boots — …   Useful english dictionary

  • sly — c.1200, from O.N. sloegr cunning, crafty, sly, from P.Gmc. *slogis (Cf. Low Ger. slu cunning, sly ), probably from base *slog hit (see SLAY (Cf. slay)), with an original notion of able to hit. Cf. Ger. verschlagen cunning, crafty, sly,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Boots and saddles — Boot Boot, n. [OE. bote, OF. bote, F. botte, LL. botta; of uncertain origin.] 1. A covering for the foot and lower part of the leg, ordinarily made of leather. [1913 Webster] 2. An instrument of torture for the leg, formerly used to extort… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • boots —    This was the name for the servant in an inn or hotel whose job was to clean the boots of the customers. He was summoned or addressed by his professional title. The term is often found as a vocative in eighteenth and nineteenth century… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • slyboots — sly•boots [[t]ˈslaɪˌbuts[/t]] n. (used with a sing. v.) cvb an engagingly sly or mischievous person • Etymology: 1690–1700 …   From formal English to slang

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  • Boot — Boot, n. [OE. bote, OF. bote, F. botte, LL. botta; of uncertain origin.] 1. A covering for the foot and lower part of the leg, ordinarily made of leather. [1913 Webster] 2. An instrument of torture for the leg, formerly used to extort confessions …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Boot catcher — Boot Boot, n. [OE. bote, OF. bote, F. botte, LL. botta; of uncertain origin.] 1. A covering for the foot and lower part of the leg, ordinarily made of leather. [1913 Webster] 2. An instrument of torture for the leg, formerly used to extort… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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