Slow match
Slow Slow (sl[=o]), a. [Compar. {Slower} (sl[=o]"[~e]r); superl. {Slowest}.] [OE. slow, slaw, AS. sl[=a]w; akin to OS. sl[=e]u blunt, dull, D. sleeuw, slee, sour, OHG. sl[=e]o blunt, dull, Icel. sl[=o]r, sl[ae]r, Dan. sl["o]v, Sw. sl["o]. Cf. {Sloe}, and {Sloth}.] 1. Moving a short space in a relatively long time; not swift; not quick in motion; not rapid; moderate; deliberate; as, a slow stream; a slow motion. [1913 Webster]

2. Not happening in a short time; gradual; late. [1913 Webster]

These changes in the heavens, though slow, produced Like change on sea and land, sidereal blast. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. Not ready; not prompt or quick; dilatory; sluggish; as, slow of speech, and slow of tongue. [1913 Webster]

Fixed on defense, the Trojans are not slow To guard their shore from an expected foe. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. Not hasty; not precipitate; acting with deliberation; tardy; inactive. [1913 Webster]

He that is slow to wrath is of great understanding. --Prov. xiv. 29. [1913 Webster]

5. Behind in time; indicating a time earlier than the true time; as, the clock or watch is slow. [1913 Webster]

6. Not advancing or improving rapidly; as, the slow growth of arts and sciences. [1913 Webster]

7. Heavy in wit; not alert, prompt, or spirited; wearisome; dull. [Colloq.] --Dickens. Thackeray. [1913 Webster]

Note: Slow is often used in the formation of compounds for the most part self-explaining; as, slow-gaited, slow-paced, slow-sighted, slow-winged, and the like. [1913 Webster]

{Slow coach}, a slow person. See def.7, above. [Colloq.]

{Slow lemur}, or {Slow loris} (Zo["o]l.), an East Indian nocturnal lemurine animal ({Nycticebus tardigradus}) about the size of a small cat; -- so called from its slow and deliberate movements. It has very large round eyes and is without a tail. Called also {bashful Billy}.

{Slow match}. See under {Match}. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Dilatory; late; lingering; tardy; sluggish; dull; inactive.

Usage: {Slow}, {Tardy}, {Dilatory}. Slow is the wider term, denoting either a want of rapid motion or inertness of intellect. Dilatory signifies a proneness to defer, a habit of delaying the performance of what we know must be done. Tardy denotes the habit of being behind hand; as, tardy in making up one's acounts. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Slow match — or match cord is the very slow burning cord or twine fuse used by early gunpowder musketeers, artillerymen, and soldiers to ignite matchlock muskets, cannons, and petards. Slow matches were most suitable for use around black powder weapons… …   Wikipedia

  • Slow match — Match Match (m[a^]ch), n. [OE. macche, F. m[ e]che, F. m[ e]che, fr. L. myxa a lamp nozzle, Gr. my xa mucus, nostril, a lamp nozzle. Cf. {Mucus}.] Anything used for catching and retaining or communicating fire, made of some substance which takes… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slow match — slow′ match′ n. a slow burning match or fuse, often consisting of a rope or cord soaked in a solution of saltpeter • Etymology: 1795–1805 …   From formal English to slang

  • slow match — n. a match, or fuse, that burns slowly, used for setting off blasting charges …   English World dictionary

  • slow match — a slow burning match or fuse, often consisting of a rope or cord soaked in a solution of saltpeter. [1795 1805] * * * …   Universalium

  • slow match — /sloʊ ˈmætʃ/ (say sloh mach) noun a slow burning match or fuse, often consisting of a rope or cord soaked in a solution of saltpetre …   Australian English dictionary

  • slow match — noun match or fuse made to burn slowly and evenly • Hypernyms: ↑match, ↑lucifer, ↑friction match …   Useful english dictionary

  • slow match — noun a slow burning fuse used to ignite a matchlock musket or fire a cannon …   Wiktionary

  • slow match — noun historical a slow burning wick or cord for lighting explosives …   English new terms dictionary

  • slow match — noun Date: circa 1802 a match or fuse made so as to burn slowly and evenly and used for firing (as of blasting charges) …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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