Sithe
Sithe Sithe, v. i. [Cf. {Sigh}.] To sigh.

Note: [A spelling of a corrupt and provincial pronunciation.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sithe — Sithe, n. A scythe. [Obs.] Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sithe — Sithe, v. t. To cut with a scythe; to scythe. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sithe — Scythe Scythe (s[imac]th), n. [OE. sithe, AS. s[=i][eth]e, sig[eth]e; akin to Icel. sig[eth]r a sickle, LG. segd, seged, seed, seid, OHG. segansa sickle, scythe, G. sense scythe, and to E. saw a cutting instrument. See {Saw}.] [Written also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sithe — Sith Sith, Sithe Sithe, n. [AS. ??? a path, way, time, occasion.] Time. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] And humbly thanked him a thousand sithes. Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sithe — sb. == time. ‘at the first sithe’ HD. 1052. RG. 264; [side]. O. and N. 299. AS. sið …   Oldest English Words

  • sithe — ˈsīth, th dialect variant of sigh …   Useful english dictionary

  • Scythe — (s[imac]th), n. [OE. sithe, AS. s[=i][eth]e, sig[eth]e; akin to Icel. sig[eth]r a sickle, LG. segd, seged, seed, seid, OHG. segansa sickle, scythe, G. sense scythe, and to E. saw a cutting instrument. See {Saw}.] [Written also {sithe} and {sythe} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sith — Sith, Sithe Sithe, n. [AS. ??? a path, way, time, occasion.] Time. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] And humbly thanked him a thousand sithes. Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sythe — Scythe Scythe (s[imac]th), n. [OE. sithe, AS. s[=i][eth]e, sig[eth]e; akin to Icel. sig[eth]r a sickle, LG. segd, seged, seed, seid, OHG. segansa sickle, scythe, G. sense scythe, and to E. saw a cutting instrument. See {Saw}.] [Written also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scythe — I. noun Etymology: Middle English sithe, from Old English sīthe; akin to Old English sagu saw more at saw Date: before 12th century an implement used for mowing (as grass) and composed of a long curving blade fastened at an angle to a long handle …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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