Signaled or Signalled
Signal Sig"nal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Signaled or Signalled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Signaling} or {Signalling}.] 1. To communicate by signals; as, to signal orders. [1913 Webster]

2. To notify by a signals; to make a signal or signals to; as, to signal a fleet to anchor. --M. Arnold. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • signal — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin signale, from Late Latin, neuter of signalis of a sign, from Latin signum Date: 14th century 1. sign, indication 2. a. an act, event, or watchword that has been agreed on as the occasion of… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • signal — [sig′nəl] n. [OFr < VL signale < neut. of LL signalis < L signum, a SIGN] 1. Now Rare a token or indication 2. a sign or event fixed or understood as the occasion for prearranged combined action [a bugle signal to attack] 3. anything… …   English World dictionary

  • Signal — Sig nal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Signaled or Signalled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Signaling} or {Signalling}.] 1. To communicate by signals; as, to signal orders. [1913 Webster] 2. To notify by a signals; to make a signal or signals to; as, to signal a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Signaling — Signal Sig nal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Signaled or Signalled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Signaling} or {Signalling}.] 1. To communicate by signals; as, to signal orders. [1913 Webster] 2. To notify by a signals; to make a signal or signals to; as, to signal …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Signalling — Signal Sig nal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Signaled or Signalled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Signaling} or {Signalling}.] 1. To communicate by signals; as, to signal orders. [1913 Webster] 2. To notify by a signals; to make a signal or signals to; as, to signal …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Interrupt — This article is about computer interrupts. For the study of the effect of disruptions on job performance, see Interruption science. In computing, an interrupt is an asynchronous signal indicating the need for attention or a synchronous event in… …   Wikipedia

  • signal — sig|nal1 W2S3 [ˈsıgnəl] n [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: signale, from Medieval Latin, from Late Latin signalis of a sign , from Latin signum; SIGN1] 1.) a sound or action that you make in order to give information to someone or tell… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • international relations — a branch of political science dealing with the relations between nations. [1970 75] * * * Study of the relations of states with each other and with international organizations and certain subnational entities (e.g., bureaucracies and political… …   Universalium

  • Umpire (cricket) — An umpire In cricket, an umpire (from the Old French nompere meaning not equal, i.e. not a member of one of the teams, impartial) is a person who has the authority to make judgements on the cricket field, according to the Laws of Cricket. Besides …   Wikipedia

  • United Kingdom — a kingdom in NW Europe, consisting of Great Britain and Northern Ireland: formerly comprising Great Britain and Ireland 1801 1922. 58,610,182; 94,242 sq. mi. (244,100 sq. km). Cap.: London. Abbr.: U.K. Official name, United Kingdom of Great… …   Universalium

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