Shucked
Shuck Shuck, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shucked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Shucking}.] 1. To deprive of the shucks or husks; as, to shuck walnuts, Indian corn, oysters, etc. [1913 Webster]

2. To remove or take off (shucks); hence, to discard; to lay aside; -- usually with off. [Colloq.]

``Shucking'' his coronet, after he had imbibed several draughts of fire water. --F. A. Ober.

He had only been in Africa long enough to shuck off the notions he had acquired about the engineering of a west coast colony. --Pall Mall Mag. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • shucked — adj Drunk, intoxicated. He came home shucked and his wife locked him out. 1950s …   Historical dictionary of American slang

  • shucked — ʃʌk n. shell, husk, outer covering of some nuts and vegetables (such as corn) v. remove a husk, peel, shell …   English contemporary dictionary

  • shuck off — ˌshuck ˈoff [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they shuck off he/she/it shucks off present participle shucking off past tense …   Useful english dictionary

  • shuck — [[t]ʃʌ̱k[/t]] shucks, shucking, shucked 1) N COUNT The shuck of something is its outer covering, for example the leaves round an ear of corn, or the shell of a shellfish. [AM] ...corn shucks. 2) VERB If you shuck something such as corn or… …   English dictionary

  • shuck — UK [ʃʌk] / US verb [transitive] Word forms shuck : present tense I/you/we/they shuck he/she/it shucks present participle shucking past tense shucked past participle shucked American to remove the shell or outer part of something such as a nut or… …   English dictionary

  • shuck off — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms shuck off : present tense I/you/we/they shuck off he/she/it shucks off present participle shucking off past tense shucked off past participle shucked off American informal to take a piece of clothing off …   English dictionary

  • shuck — [Jak] 1. n. an insincere person. □ The guy’s a shuck. Don’t believe a thing he says! □ Who needs a shuck for a legislator? 2. tv. & in. to kid someone; to tease someone. □ Cool it! I’m just shucking. □ …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • Shuck — Shuck, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shucked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Shucking}.] 1. To deprive of the shucks or husks; as, to shuck walnuts, Indian corn, oysters, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. To remove or take off (shucks); hence, to discard; to lay aside; usually… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Shucking — Shuck Shuck, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shucked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Shucking}.] 1. To deprive of the shucks or husks; as, to shuck walnuts, Indian corn, oysters, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. To remove or take off (shucks); hence, to discard; to lay aside;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • shuck — I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1674 1. shell, husk: as a. the outer covering of a nut or of Indian corn b. the shell of an oyster or clam 2. something of little value usually used in plural < not worth shucks > II …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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