Shog
Shog Shog (sh[o^]g), n. [See {Shock} a striking.] A shock; a jog; a violent concussion or impulse. [R. or Scot.] [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • shog — shog·gie; shog·gle; shog·gly; shog; …   English syllables

  • Shog — Shog, v. t. To shake; to shock. [R. or Scot.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Shog — Shog, v. i. [Cf. W. ysgogi to wag, to stir. Cf. {Jog}.] To jog; to move on. [R. or Scot.] Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • shog — /shog, shawg/, v., shogged, shogging, n. Scot. and Brit. Dial. v.t. 1. to shake; jolt. v.i. 2. to jog along. n. 3. a shake; jolt. [1350 1400; ME shoggen (v.); perh. akin to SHOCK1] * * * …   Universalium

  • shog — /ʃɒg/ (say shog) verb (t) (shogged, shogging) 1. to shake or jog. –noun 2. a rocking, jolting movement. {Scottish and northern English dialect} …   Australian English dictionary

  • shog — I. verb (shogged; shogging) Etymology: Middle English shoggen, shaggen; probably akin to Middle Dutch schocken to shake, jolt Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. chiefly dialect jolt, shake intransitive verb …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • shog — 1. noun jolt, shake 2. verb to jolt or shake …   Wiktionary

  • shog — Cleveland Dialect List to shake …   English dialects glossary

  • shog —  to shake about : a snogging horse, one that trots hard. North …   A glossary of provincial and local words used in England

  • shog — I. ˈshäg verb (shogged ; shogged ; shogging ; shogs) Etymology: Middle English shoggen; probably akin to Middle Dutch schocken to shake, jolt more at shock (disorganize) transitive verb …   Useful english dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”