Shend
Shend Shend, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shent}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Shending}.] [AS. scendan to disgrace, bring to shame, from sceand, sceond, disgrace, dishonor, shame; akin to G. schande, Goth. skanda. See {Shame}, n.] 1. To injure, mar, spoil, or harm. [Obs.] ``Loss of time shendeth us.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

I fear my body will be shent. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To blame, reproach, or revile; to degrade, disgrace, or put to shame. [Archaic] --R. Browning. [1913 Webster]

The famous name of knighthood foully shend. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

She passed the rest as Cynthia doth shend The lesser stars. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • shend — /shend/, v.t., shent, shending. Archaic. 1. to put to shame. 2. to reproach or scold. 3. to destroy or injure; damage. [bef. 900; ME s(c)henden, OE (ge)scendan (c. D schenden, G schänden), deriv. of scand shame, infamy] * * * …   Universalium

  • shend — I. ˈshend transitive verb (shent nt ; shent ; shending ; shends) Etymology: Middle English shenden, from Old English scendan; akin to Old Frisian skenda to shame, disgrace, Old Saxon skendian, Old High German scenten; causative denominative from… …   Useful english dictionary

  • shend — transitive verb (shent; shending) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English scendan; akin to Old English scamu shame more at shame Date: before 12th century 1. archaic to put to shame or confusion 2. archaic reprove, revile 3 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • shend — verb /ʃɛnd/ a) to blame , Late C14: Þou seyest, riȝt as womes shende a tree, / Riȝt so a wyf destroyeþ hire housbounde Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Wife of Baths Tale’, Canterbury Tales b) to destroy, to spoil …   Wiktionary

  • shend — v. a. == injure. RG. 379, 506; part. ‘ischend’ == corrupt. Pol. S. 197; ‘yssend.’ RG. 212. AS. scendan …   Oldest English Words

  • to-shend — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Shending — Shend Shend, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shent}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Shending}.] [AS. scendan to disgrace, bring to shame, from sceand, sceond, disgrace, dishonor, shame; akin to G. schande, Goth. skanda. See {Shame}, n.] 1. To injure, mar, spoil, or harm …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Shent — Shend Shend, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shent}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Shending}.] [AS. scendan to disgrace, bring to shame, from sceand, sceond, disgrace, dishonor, shame; akin to G. schande, Goth. skanda. See {Shame}, n.] 1. To injure, mar, spoil, or harm …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The Very Things — Origin Redditch, England Genres Post punk Years active 1983–1988 Labels Corpus Christi, Reflex, Strange Fruit, One Little Indian, Fire …   Wikipedia

  • Shendful — Shend ful, a. Destructive; ruinous; disgraceful. [Obs.] {Shend ful*ly}, adv. [Obs.] Fabyan. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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