Sergeantry
Sergeantry \Ser"geant*ry\, n. [CF. OF. sergenteric.] See {Sergeanty}. [R.] [Written also {serjeantry}.] [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • sergeantry — ser·geant·ry …   English syllables

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  • serjeantry — Sergeantry Ser geant*ry, n. [CF. OF. sergenteric.] See {Sergeanty}. [R.] [Written also {serjeantry}.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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