Sequester
Sequester Se*ques"ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sequestered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sequestering}.] [F. s['e]questrer, L. sequestrare to give up for safe keeping, from sequester a depositary or trustee in whose hands the thing contested was placed until the dispute was settled. Cf. {Sequestrate}.] 1. (Law) To separate from the owner for a time; to take from parties in controversy and put into the possession of an indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as property belonging to another, and hold it till the profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or till the owner has performed the decree of court, or clears himself of contempt; in international law, to confiscate. [1913 Webster]

Formerly the goods of a defendant in chancery were, in the last resort, sequestered and detained to enforce the decrees of the court. And now the profits of a benefice are sequestered to pay the debts of ecclesiastics. --Blackstone. [1913 Webster]

2. To cause (one) to submit to the process of sequestration; to deprive (one) of one's estate, property, etc. [1913 Webster]

It was his tailor and his cook, his fine fashions and his French ragouts, which sequestered him. --South. [1913 Webster]

3. To set apart; to put aside; to remove; to separate from other things. [1913 Webster]

I had wholly sequestered my civil affairss. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

4. To cause to retire or withdraw into obscurity; to seclude; to withdraw; -- often used reflexively. [1913 Webster]

When men most sequester themselves from action. --Hooker. [1913 Webster]

A love and desire to sequester a man's self for a higher conversation. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

5. (Chem.) To bind, so as to make [a metal ion] unavailable in its normal form; -- said of chelating agents, such as EDTA, which, in a solution, bind tightly to multivalent metal cations, thereby lowering their effective concentration in solution. Compounds employed particularly for this purpose are called sequestering agents, or chelating agents. In biochemistry, sequestration is one means of reversibly inhibiting enzymes which depend on divalent metal cations (such as Magnesium) for their activity. Such agents are used, for example, to help preserve blood for storage and subsequent use in transfusion. > [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • sequester — se·ques·ter 1 /si kwes tər/ vt tered, ter·ing [Anglo French sequestrer, from Middle French, from Latin sequestrare to hand over to a trustee, from sequester third party to whom disputed property is entrusted, agent, from secus beside, otherwise]… …   Law dictionary

  • Sequester — steht für einen Zwangsverwalter – siehe Sequester (Recht) eine Beschlagnahme ein abgestorbenes Gewebestück – siehe Sequester (Medizin) Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sequester — Se*ques ter, v. i. 1. To withdraw; to retire. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] To sequester out of the world into Atlantic and Utopian politics. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) To renounce (as a widow may) any concern with the estate of her husband. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sequester — late 14c., from O.Fr. sequestrer (14c.), from L.L. sequestrare to place in safekeeping, from L. sequester trustee, mediator, probably originally follower, related to sequi to follow (see SEQUEL (Cf. sequel)). Meaning seize by authority,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • sequester — ► VERB 1) isolate or hide away. 2) another term for SEQUESTRATE(Cf. ↑sequestrator). ORIGIN Latin sequestrare commit for safekeeping , from sequester trustee …   English terms dictionary

  • sequester — [si kwes′tər] vt. [ME sequestren < MFr sequestrer < LL sequestrare, to remove, lay aside, separate < L sequester, trustee, akin to sequi: see SEQUENT] 1. to set off or apart; separate; segregate; often, to segregate or isolate (the jury) …   English World dictionary

  • Sequester — Se*ques ter, n. 1. Sequestration; separation. [R.] [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) A person with whom two or more contending parties deposit the subject matter of the controversy; one who mediates between two parties; a mediator; an umpire or referee.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sequéster — (lat.), Mittelsperson, s. Sequestration; in der Medizin soviel wie abgestorbenes Knochenstück (s. Knochenbrand); Sequestrotomie, die operative Entfernung eines solchen …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Sequéster — (lat.), juristisch, s. Sequestration; medizinisch ein abgestorbenes Knochenstück (s. Knochenbrand); Sequestrotomīe, die operative Entfernung eines solchen …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Sequester — Sequester, Sequestration, lat. deutsch, Beschlagnahme einer Sache, als Sicherungsmittel oder zur Urtheilsvollstreckung, nach den Grundsätzen des Depositums (actio depositi sequestraria); erfolgt vertragsmäßig, freiwillig oder durch gerichtliche… …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

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