Sentiment
Sentiment Sen"ti*ment, n. [OE. sentement, OF. sentement, F. sentiment, fr. L. sentire to perceive by the senses and mind, to feel, to think. See {Sentient}, a.] 1. A thought prompted by passion or feeling; a state of mind in view of some subject; feeling toward or respecting some person or thing; disposition prompting to action or expression. [1913 Webster]

The word sentiment, agreeably to the use made of it by our best English writers, expresses, in my own opinion very happily, those complex determinations of the mind which result from the co["o]peration of our rational powers and of our moral feelings. --Stewart. [1913 Webster]

Alike to council or the assembly came, With equal souls and sentiments the same. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, generally, a decision of the mind formed by deliberation or reasoning; thought; opinion; notion; judgment; as, to express one's sentiments on a subject. [1913 Webster]

Sentiments of philosophers about the perception of external objects. --Reid. [1913 Webster]

Sentiment, as here and elsewhere employed by Reid in the meaning of opinion (sententia), is not to be imitated. --Sir W. Hamilton. [1913 Webster]

3. A sentence, or passage, considered as the expression of a thought; a maxim; a saying; a toast. [1913 Webster]

4. Sensibility; feeling; tender susceptibility. [1913 Webster]

Mr. Hume sometimes employs (after the manner of the French metaphysicians) sentiment as synonymous with feeling; a use of the word quite unprecedented in our tongue. --Stewart. [1913 Webster]

Less of sentiment than sense. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Thought; opinion; notion; sensibility; feeling.

Usage: {Sentiment}, {Opinion}, {Feeling}. An opinion is an intellectual judgment in respect to any and every kind of truth. Feeling describes those affections of pleasure and pain which spring from the exercise of our sentient and emotional powers. Sentiment (particularly in the plural) lies between them, denoting settled opinions or principles in regard to subjects which interest the feelings strongly, and are presented more or less constantly in practical life. Hence, it is more appropriate to speak of our religious sentiments than opinions, unless we mean to exclude all reference to our feelings. The word sentiment, in the singular, leans ordinarily more to the side of feeling, and denotes a refined sensibility on subjects affecting the heart. ``On questions of feeling, taste, observation, or report, we define our sentiments. On questions of science, argument, or metaphysical abstraction, we define our opinions. The sentiments of the heart. The opinions of the mind . . . There is more of instinct in sentiment, and more of definition in opinion. The admiration of a work of art which results from first impressions is classed with our sentiments; and, when we have accounted to ourselves for the approbation, it is classed with our opinions.'' --W. Taylor. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • SENTIMENT — «Le cœur a ses raisons, que la raison ne connaît point; on le sait en mille choses.» Ces mille choses sont ce que nous appelons nos sentiments. Et, comme l’exprime bien la phrase de Pascal, ceux ci nous apparaissent à la fois comme irremplaçables …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • sentiment — Sentiment. s. m. v. Impression que font les objets sur les sens. Sentiment picquant, aigu. douloureux, agreable, exquis, delicat. Il sign. aussi, La fonction des sens. Il y a encore quelque sentiment dans cette partie. Il n y a plus de sentiment… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • sentiment — SENTIMÉNT, sentimente, s.n. 1. Proces afectiv specific uman, care exprimă atitudinea omului faţă de realitate; simţământ. ♦ Afecţiune. 2. Facultatea de a simţi, de a cunoaşte, de a aprecia ceva; conştiinţă. ♦ Credinţă, impresie intimă; convingere …   Dicționar Român

  • sentiment — sen‧ti‧ment [ˈsentmənt] noun [uncountable] the feelings and opinions people have about something: • The Dow Jones Index rose, reflecting market sentiment that the economy is improving. • Encouraging economic news reinforced bullish (= positive… …   Financial and business terms

  • Sentiment — can refer to:*Feelings and emotions*Sentimentality, the literary device which is used to induce an emotional response disproportionate to the situation, and thus to substitute heightened and generally unthinking feeling for normal ethical and… …   Wikipedia

  • sentiment — late 14c., sentement, personal experience, one s own feeling, from O.Fr. sentement (12c.), from M.L. sentimentum feeling, affection, opinion, from L. sentire to feel (see SENSE (Cf. sense)). Meaning what one feels about something (1630s) and… …   Etymology dictionary

  • sentiment — sentìment (sentimȅnt) m <G mn nātā> DEFINICIJA 1. ideja, mišljenje ili odnos koji je zasnovan više na emocijama negoli na razumu; osjećaj 2. a. svojstvo onoga koji je prijemčiv na osjećaje b. emocija, ob. romantični ili nostalgični osjećaj… …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • sentiment — [sen′tə mənt] n. [ME sentement < OFr < ML sentimentum < L sentire, to feel, SENSE] 1. a complex combination of feelings and opinions as a basis for action or judgment; general emotionalized attitude [the sentiment of romantic love] 2. a… …   English World dictionary

  • Sentiment — (fr., spr. Sangtimang), 1) Empfindung, Gefühl; 2) Gesinnung; 3) Meinung, Urtheil; 4) breites Halsband, gewöhnlich von Sammet, welches vornehme Damen wie ein Halstuch um den Hals trugen u. welches vorn von einem goldenen Schlosse zusammengehalten… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Sentiment — (franz., spr. ßangtimāng), Empfindung; Gesinnung, Denkart …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

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