Sensibility Sen`si*bil"i*ty, n.; pl. {Sensibilities}. [Cf. F. sensibilit['e], LL. sensibilitas.] 1. (Physiol.) The quality or state of being sensible, or capable of sensation; capacity to feel or perceive. [1913 Webster]

2. The capacity of emotion or feeling, as distinguished from the intellect and the will; peculiar susceptibility of impression, pleasurable or painful; delicacy of feeling; quick emotion or sympathy; as, sensibility to pleasure or pain; sensibility to shame or praise; exquisite sensibility; -- often used in the plural. ``Sensibilities so fine!'' --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

The true lawgiver ought to have a heart full of sensibility. --Burke. [1913 Webster]

His sensibilities seem rather to have been those of patriotism than of wounded pride. --Marshall. [1913 Webster]

3. Experience of sensation; actual feeling. [1913 Webster]

This adds greatly to my sensibility. --Burke. [1913 Webster]

4. That quality of an instrument which makes it indicate very slight changes of condition; delicacy; as, the sensibility of a balance, or of a thermometer. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Taste; susceptibility; feeling. See {Taste}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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