Sensation Sen*sa"tion, n. [Cf. F. sensation. See {Sensate}.] 1. (Physiol.) An impression, or the consciousness of an impression, made upon the central nervous organ, through the medium of a sensory or afferent nerve or one of the organs of sense; a feeling, or state of consciousness, whether agreeable or disagreeable, produced either by an external object (stimulus), or by some change in the internal state of the body. [1913 Webster]

Perception is only a special kind of knowledge, and sensation a special kind of feeling. . . . Knowledge and feeling, perception and sensation, though always coexistent, are always in the inverse ratio of each other. --Sir W. Hamilton. [1913 Webster]

2. A purely spiritual or psychical affection; agreeable or disagreeable feelings occasioned by objects that are not corporeal or material. [1913 Webster]

3. A state of excited interest or feeling, or that which causes it. [1913 Webster]

The sensation caused by the appearance of that work is still remembered by many. --Brougham. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Perception.

Usage: {Sensation}, {Perseption}. The distinction between these words, when used in mental philosophy, may be thus stated; if I simply smell a rose, I have a sensation; if I refer that smell to the external object which occasioned it, I have a perception. Thus, the former is mere feeling, without the idea of an object; the latter is the mind's apprehension of some external object as occasioning that feeling. ``Sensation properly expresses that change in the state of the mind which is produced by an impression upon an organ of sense (of which change we can conceive the mind to be conscious, without any knowledge of external objects). Perception, on the other hand, expresses the knowledge or the intimations we obtain by means of our sensations concerning the qualities of matter, and consequently involves, in every instance, the notion of externality, or outness, which it is necessary to exclude in order to seize the precise import of the word sensation.'' --Fleming. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

(without perception or a reference to any object that causes the feeling), , / ,

Look at other dictionaries:

  • sensation — [ sɑ̃sasjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1370, repris XVIIe; bas lat. sensatio « compréhension » 1 ♦ Phénomène psychophysiologique par lequel une stimulation externe ou interne a un effet modificateur spécifique (⇒ 1. sens, I ) sur l être vivant et conscient; état… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Sensation — Sensation  ежегодный фестиваль электронной танцевальной музыки, организуемый компанией ID T. До 2005 года проводился исключительно в Нидерландах на стадионе Амстердам АренА. Начиная с 2005 проходил как минимум один раз в Польше, Испании,… …   Википедия

  • sensation — 1 Sensation, percept, sense datum, sensum, image can denote the experience or process which is the result of the activity of a sense organ and its associated neural structures. Sensation (see also SENSATION 2), the most general of these terms, is …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Sensation — White 2007, Letonia …   Wikipedia Español

  • Sensation — Sf std. (17. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus ne. sensation oder frz. sensation, beides aus l. sēnsātio, aus l. sēnsātus mit Verstand begabt , zu l. sēnsus Verstand , Abstraktum zu l. sentīre (sēnsum) fühlen, denken ; sensibel. Die Bedeutung ist… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • sensation — [sen sā′shən] n. [LL sensatio < sensatus: see SENSATE] 1. the power or process of receiving conscious sense impressions through direct stimulation of the bodily organism [the sensations of hearing, seeing, touching, etc.] 2. an immediate… …   English World dictionary

  • Sensation — »Aufsehen erregendes Ereignis; Riesenüberraschung; verblüffende Leistung«: Das Fremdwort wurde im 18. Jh. – zunächst in der Bedeutung »Empfindung, Sinneseindruck« – aus gleichbed. frz. sensation entlehnt. Später (18./19. Jh.) übernahm es dann die …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • sensation — 1610s, a reaction to external stimulation of the sense organs, from M.L. sensationem (nom. sensatio), from L.L. sensatus endowed with sense, sensible, from L. sensus feeling (see SENSE (Cf. sense)). Meaning state of shock, surprise, in a… …   Etymology dictionary

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  • sensation — Sensation. s. f. Impression que l ame reçoit des objets par les sens. Il est difficile d expliquer comme la sensation se fait. Ce terme n a d usage que dans le dogmatique …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

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