Self
Self Self, n.; pl. {Selves}. 1. The individual as the object of his own reflective consciousness; the man viewed by his own cognition as the subject of all his mental phenomena, the agent in his own activities, the subject of his own feelings, and the possessor of capacities and character; a person as a distinct individual; a being regarded as having personality. ``Those who liked their real selves.'' --Addison. [1913 Webster]

A man's self may be the worst fellow to converse with in the world. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

The self, the I, is recognized in every act of intelligence as the subject to which that act belongs. It is I that perceive, I that imagine, I that remember, I that attend, I that compare, I that feel, I that will, I that am conscious. --Sir W. Hamilton. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, personal interest, or love of private interest; selfishness; as, self is his whole aim. [1913 Webster]

3. Personification; embodiment. [Poetic.] [1913 Webster]

She was beauty's self. --Thomson. [1913 Webster]

Note: Self is united to certain personal pronouns and pronominal adjectives to express emphasis or distinction. Thus, for emphasis; I myself will write; I will examine for myself; thou thyself shalt go; thou shalt see for thyself; you yourself shall write; you shall see for yourself; he himself shall write; he shall examine for himself; she herself shall write; she shall examine for herself; the child itself shall be carried; it shall be present itself. It is also used reflexively; as, I abhor myself; thou enrichest thyself; he loves himself; she admires herself; it pleases itself; we walue ourselves; ye hurry yourselves; they see themselves. Himself, herself, themselves, are used in the nominative case, as well as in the objective. ``Jesus himself baptized not, but his disciples.'' --John iv. 2. [1913 Webster]

Note: self is used in the formation of innumerable compounds, usually of obvious signification, in most of which it denotes either the agent or the object of the action expressed by the word with which it is joined, or the person in behalf of whom it is performed, or the person or thing to, for, or towards whom or which a quality, attribute, or feeling expressed by the following word belongs, is directed, or is exerted, or from which it proceeds; or it denotes the subject of, or object affected by, such action, quality, attribute, feeling, or the like; as, self-abandoning, self-abnegation, self-abhorring, self-absorbed, self-accusing, self-adjusting, self-balanced, self-boasting, self-canceled, self-combating, self-commendation, self-condemned, self-conflict, self-conquest, self-constituted, self-consumed, self-contempt, self-controlled, self-deceiving, self-denying, self-destroyed, self-disclosure, self-display, self-dominion, self-doomed, self-elected, self-evolved, self-exalting, self-excusing, self-exile, self-fed, self-fulfillment, self-governed, self-harming, self-helpless, self-humiliation, self-idolized, self-inflicted, self-improvement, self-instruction, self-invited, self-judging, self-justification, self-loathing, self-loving, self-maintenance, self-mastered, self-nourishment, self-perfect, self-perpetuation, self-pleasing, self-praising, self-preserving, self-questioned, self-relying, self-restraining, self-revelation, self-ruined, self-satisfaction, self-support, self-sustained, self-sustaining, self-tormenting, self-troubling, self-trust, self-tuition, self-upbraiding, self-valuing, self-worshiping, and many others. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • self- — ♦ Élément, de l angl. self « soi même ». ⇒ auto . self élément, de l angl. self, qui signifie soi même . ⇒SELF , élém. de compos. Élém. tiré de l angl. self « soi même », de même sens, entrant dans la constr. de subst. empr. à l angl. ou faits… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • self — self, the self In sociology, the concept of self is most frequently held to derive from the philosophies of Charles Horton Cooley , William James , and George Herbert Mead , and is the foundation of symbolic interactionism . It highlights the… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • self — /self/, n., pl. selves, adj., pron., pl. selves, v. n. 1. a person or thing referred to with respect to complete individuality: one s own self. 2. a person s nature, character, etc.: his better self. 3. personal interest. 4. Philos. a …   Universalium

  • self — self; self·dom; self·hood; self·ish·ness; self·ism; self·ist; self·less; self·ness; self·same·ness; thy·self; un·self; do it your·self; do it your·self·er; non·self; it·self; self·ish; self·ward; self·ish·ly; self·ward·ness; self·wards; …   English syllables

  • Self — объектно ориентированный, прототипный язык программирования, который задумывался как развитие языка Smalltalk. Разрабатывался в лаборатории Xerox PARC, а потом в Стэндфордском университете. Это была экспериментальная разработка, целью которой… …   Википедия

  • self — [ self ] (plural selves [ selvz ] ) noun *** count or uncount who you are and what you think and feel, especially the conscious feeling of being separate and different from other people: sense of self: Young babies do not have a fully developed… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • self — W3S2 [self] n plural selves [selvz] [: Old English;] 1.) [C usually singular] the type of person you are, your character, your typical behaviour etc sb s usual/normal self ▪ Sid was not his usual smiling self. be/look/feel (like) your old self… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • self — W3S2 [self] n plural selves [selvz] [: Old English;] 1.) [C usually singular] the type of person you are, your character, your typical behaviour etc sb s usual/normal self ▪ Sid was not his usual smiling self. be/look/feel (like) your old self… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • self- — is a highly productive prefix forming compounds of various types, in most of which self acts as the object on which the action or attribute signified by the second element operates, e.g. self betrayal (= betrayal of oneself), self awareness (=… …   Modern English usage

  • self- — [self] [ME < OE < self: see SELF] prefix 1. of oneself or itself: refers to the direct object of the implied transitive verb [self love, self restraint] 2. by oneself or itself: refers to the subject of the implied verb [self acting] 3. in …   English World dictionary

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