Seigniory
Seigniory Seign"ior*y, n.; pl. {-ies}. [OE. seignorie, OF. seigneurie, F. seigneurie; cf. It. signoria.] 1. The power or authority of a lord; dominion. [1913 Webster]

O'Neal never had any seigniory over that country but what by encroachment he got upon the English. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

2. The territory over which a lord holds jurisdiction; a manor. [Written also {seigneury}, and {seignory}.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • seigniory — index domain (land owned) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • seigniory — [sān′yər ē] n. pl. seigniories [ME seignorie < OFr] 1. the dominion or estate of a seignior 2. the rights or authority of a feudal lord 3. a body of lords, esp. those of a medieval Italian republic 4. SEIGNEURY (sense 2) …   English World dictionary

  • seigniory — or seignory noun (plural gniories or gnories) Date: 14th century 1. lordship, dominion; specifically the power or authority of a feudal lord 2. the territory over which a lord holds jurisdiction …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • seigniory — /seen yeuh ree/, n., pl. seigniories. 1. the power or authority of a seignior. 2. Hist. a lord s domain. Also, signory. [1250 1300; ME seignorie < OF; see SEIGNEUR, Y3] * * * …   Universalium

  • seigniory — noun The estate of a feudal lord Syn: seigneury, signory See Also: seigneur …   Wiktionary

  • seigniory — seign·ior·y || sɪːnjÉ™rɪ / seɪn n. estate of a seignior; power or rank of a seignior …   English contemporary dictionary

  • seigniory — [ seɪnjəri] (also seigneury) noun (plural seigniories) the position, authority, or domain of a feudal lord. Origin ME: from OFr. seignorie, from seigneur (see seigneur) …   English new terms dictionary

  • seigniory — n. Lordship, manor …   New dictionary of synonyms

  • seigniory — sei·gniory …   English syllables

  • seigniory — sei•gnior•y [[t]ˈsin yə ri, ˈseɪn [/t]] n. pl. gnior•ies 1) why the power or authority of a seignior 2) why a lord s domain …   From formal English to slang

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