Seepage
Seepage Seep"age, n. 1. The act or process of seeping; percolation. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. a fluid that seeps out of a container; as, seepage from a reservoir. [PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Seepage — Seep age, or Sipage Sip age, n. Water that seeped or oozed through a porous soil. [Scot. & U. S.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • seepage — index osmosis Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • seepage — (n.) 1825, from SEEP (Cf. seep) + AGE (Cf. age) …   Etymology dictionary

  • seepage — [sēpij] n. 1. the act or process of seeping; leakage; oozing 2. liquid that seeps …   English World dictionary

  • seepage — [[t]si͟ːpɪʤ[/t]] N UNCOUNT Seepage is the slow flow of a liquid through something. The industry s chemical seepage and waste have caused untold damage …   English dictionary

  • seepage — /see pij/, n. 1. the act or process of seeping; leakage. 2. something that seeps or leaks out. 3. a quantity that has seeped out. [1815 25; SEEP + AGE] * * * ▪ geology       in soil engineering, movement of water in soils, often a critical… …   Universalium

  • seepage — noun (singular, uncountable) a gradual flow of liquid through small spaces or holes: Looks like a seepage problem in your basement …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • seepage — geofiltracija statusas Aprobuotas sritis statyba apibrėžtis Požeminio vandens sunkimasis užtvankoje, jos pagrindo ir šonų grunte dėl aukštutinio ir žemutinio bjefų vandens lygio skirtumo (patvankos). Susidaro vientisa geofiltracijos tėkmė, kuri… …   Lithuanian dictionary (lietuvių žodynas)

  • seepage — seep ► VERB ▪ (of a liquid) flow or leak slowly through porous material or small holes. DERIVATIVES seepage noun. ORIGIN perhaps a dialect form of an Old English word meaning «to soak» …   English terms dictionary

  • seepage — noun Date: circa 1825 1. the process of seeping ; oozing 2. a quantity of fluid that has seeped (as through porous material) …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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