Seam presser
Seam Seam, n. [OE. seem, seam, AS. se['a]m; akin to D. zoom, OHG. soum, G. saum, LG. soom, Icel. saumr, Sw. & Dan. s["o]m, and E. sew. [root] 156. See {Sew} to fasten with thread.] 1. The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth or leather. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, a line of junction; a joint; a suture, as on a ship, a floor, or other structure; the line of union, or joint, of two boards, planks, metal plates, etc. [1913 Webster]

Precepts should be so finely wrought together . . . that no coarse seam may discover where they join. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

3. (Geol. & Mining) A thin layer or stratum; a narrow vein between two thicker strata; as, a seam of coal. [1913 Webster]

4. A line or depression left by a cut or wound; a scar; a cicatrix. [1913 Webster]

{Seam blast}, a blast made by putting the powder into seams or cracks of rocks.

{Seam lace}, a lace used by carriage makers to cover seams and edges; -- called also {seaming lace}.

{Seam presser}. (Agric.) (a) A heavy roller to press down newly plowed furrows. (b) A tailor's sadiron for pressing seams. --Knight.

{Seam set}, a set for flattering the seams of metal sheets, leather work, etc. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Seam — Seam, n. [OE. seem, seam, AS. se[ a]m; akin to D. zoom, OHG. soum, G. saum, LG. soom, Icel. saumr, Sw. & Dan. s[ o]m, and E. sew. [root] 156. See {Sew} to fasten with thread.] 1. The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Seam blast — Seam Seam, n. [OE. seem, seam, AS. se[ a]m; akin to D. zoom, OHG. soum, G. saum, LG. soom, Icel. saumr, Sw. & Dan. s[ o]m, and E. sew. [root] 156. See {Sew} to fasten with thread.] 1. The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Seam lace — Seam Seam, n. [OE. seem, seam, AS. se[ a]m; akin to D. zoom, OHG. soum, G. saum, LG. soom, Icel. saumr, Sw. & Dan. s[ o]m, and E. sew. [root] 156. See {Sew} to fasten with thread.] 1. The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Seam set — Seam Seam, n. [OE. seem, seam, AS. se[ a]m; akin to D. zoom, OHG. soum, G. saum, LG. soom, Icel. saumr, Sw. & Dan. s[ o]m, and E. sew. [root] 156. See {Sew} to fasten with thread.] 1. The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • seaming lace — Seam Seam, n. [OE. seem, seam, AS. se[ a]m; akin to D. zoom, OHG. soum, G. saum, LG. soom, Icel. saumr, Sw. & Dan. s[ o]m, and E. sew. [root] 156. See {Sew} to fasten with thread.] 1. The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sewing machine — Elias Howe s lockstitch machine, invented 1845 A sewing machine is a textile machine used to stitch fabric, cards and other material together with thread. Sewing machines were invented during the first Industrial Revolution to decrease the amount …   Wikipedia

  • clothing and footwear industry — Introduction also called  apparel and allied industries,  garment industries,  or  soft goods industries,         factories and mills producing outerwear, underwear, headwear, footwear, belts, purses, luggage, gloves, scarfs, ties, and household… …   Universalium

  • Aplatisseur de voile — Un aplatisseur de voile. L aplatisseur de voile est un outil de voilerie utilisé sur les grands voiliers au XIXe siècle. Il mesurait environ 13 à 15cm ; il était utilisé par les marins, principalement sur les baleiniers, lorsqu il fallait… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • textile — /teks tuyl, til/, n. 1. any cloth or goods produced by weaving, knitting, or felting. 2. a material, as a fiber or yarn, used in or suitable for weaving: Glass can be used as a textile. adj. 3. woven or capable of being woven: textile fabrics. 4 …   Universalium

  • Davis Sewing Machine Company — The Davis company began in 1868 in Watertown, USA and later moved to Dayton, Ohio in about 1890. Davis sewing machines had no conventional four motion feed (invented by Allen B Wilson and used in most other machines) as it is the needle bar and… …   Wikipedia

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