Scuttle cask
Scuttle Scut"tle (sk[u^]t"t'l), n. [OF. escoutille, F. ['e]scoutille, cf. Sp. escotilla; probably akin to Sp. escotar to cut a thing so as to make it fit, to hollow a garment about the neck, perhaps originally, to cut a bosom-shaped piece out, and of Teutonic origin; cf. D. schoot lap, bosom, G. schoss, Goth. skauts the hem of a garnment. Cf. {Sheet} an expanse.] 1. A small opening in an outside wall or covering, furnished with a lid. Specifically: (a) (Naut.) A small opening or hatchway in the deck of a ship, large enough to admit a man, and with a lid for covering it, also, a like hole in the side or bottom of a ship. (b) An opening in the roof of a house, with a lid. [1913 Webster]

2. The lid or door which covers or closes an opening in a roof, wall, or the like. [1913 Webster]

{Scuttle butt}, or {Scuttle cask} (Naut.), a butt or cask with a large hole in it, used to contain the fresh water for daily use in a ship. --Totten. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Scuttle — Scut tle (sk[u^]t t l), n. [OF. escoutille, F. [ e]scoutille, cf. Sp. escotilla; probably akin to Sp. escotar to cut a thing so as to make it fit, to hollow a garment about the neck, perhaps originally, to cut a bosom shaped piece out, and of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scuttle butt — Scuttle Scut tle (sk[u^]t t l), n. [OF. escoutille, F. [ e]scoutille, cf. Sp. escotilla; probably akin to Sp. escotar to cut a thing so as to make it fit, to hollow a garment about the neck, perhaps originally, to cut a bosom shaped piece out,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scuttlebutt — 1805, water cask kept on a ship s deck, from scuttle opening in a ship s deck (see scuttle (v.2)) + butt barrel. Earlier scuttle cask (1777). Meaning rumor, gossip first recorded 1901, originally nautical slang, traditionally said to be from… …   Etymology dictionary

  • scuttlebutt — noun /ˈskʌtəlbʌt/ a) A butt with a scuttle, a keg of drinking water with a hole cut in it, on board ship. Leaning over the scuttlebutt one afternoon, Bond suddenly realized hed been gulping water for maybe a minute. b) Gossip, rumour, idle… …   Wiktionary

  • Glossary of nautical terms — This is a glossary of nautical terms; some remain current, many date from the 17th 19th century. See also Wiktionary s nautical terms, Category:Nautical terms, and Nautical metaphors in English. Contents: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R …   Wikipedia

  • bucket — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. pail, tub; scoop. See receptacle. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. pail, canister, can, basin, cask, scuttle, kettle, hod; see also can 1 , container , pot 1 . • kick the bucket*, Syn. expire, lose one s life …   English dictionary for students

  • Scuttlebutt — means water fountain or a rumor. [http://www.merriam webster.com/dictionary/scuttlebutt Definition of scuttlebutt from the Merriam Webster Online Dictionary ] Retrieved 2008 03 16 ] As Slang Water for immediate consumption on a sailing ship was… …   Wikipedia

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  • List of U.S. Marine Corps acronyms and expressions — This is a list of acronyms, expressions, euphemisms, jargon, military slang, and sayings in common or formerly common use in the United States Marine Corps. Many of the words or phrases have varying levels of acceptance among different units or… …   Wikipedia

  • List of United States Marine Corps acronyms and expressions — This is a list of acronyms, expressions, euphemisms, jargon, military slang, and sayings in common or formerly common use in the United States Marine Corps. Many of the words or phrases have varying levels of acceptance among different units or… …   Wikipedia

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