Scull
Scull \Scull\, n. [See 1st {School}.] A shoal of fish. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • scull — scull …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • scull — [ skyl; skɶl ] n. m. • 1876; mot angl., du suéd. skal ♦ Anglic. Sport Bateau d aviron de compétition monté en couple. Des sculls. Double scull, monté par deux rameurs ayant chacun deux avirons. ● scull nom masculin (anglais scull) En aviron, rame …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Scull — Scull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sculled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sculling}.] (Naut.) To impel (a boat) with a pair of sculls, or with a single scull or oar worked over the stern obliquely from side to side. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scull — Scull, v. i. To impel a boat with a scull or sculls. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scull — (sk[u^]l), n. (Anat.) The skull. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scull — Scull, n. [Of uncertain origin; cf. Icel. skola to wash.] 1. (Naut.) (a) A boat; a cockboat. See {Sculler}. (b) One of a pair of short oars worked by one person. (c) A single oar used at the stern in propelling a boat. [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo[… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scull — scull; scull·er; …   English syllables

  • scull — ► NOUN 1) each of a pair of small oars used by a single rower. 2) an oar placed over the stern of a boat to propel it with a side to side motion. 3) a light, narrow boat propelled with a scull or a pair of sculls. ► VERB ▪ propel a boat with… …   English terms dictionary

  • scull — [skul] n. [ME skulle, prob. < Scand form akin to obs. Swed skolle, thin plate < IE base * (s)kel , to cut > HELM2] 1. an oar mounted at the stern of a boat and worked from side to side to move the boat forward 2. either of a pair of… …   English World dictionary

  • scull — (n.) kind of oar, mid 14c., of unknown origin. The verb is from 1620s. Related: Sculled; sculling …   Etymology dictionary

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