Scudded
Scud Scud (sk[u^]d), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scudded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scudding}.] [Dan. skyde to shoot, shove, push, akin to skud shot, gunshot, a shoot, young bough, and to E. shoot. [root]159. See {Shoot}.] 1. To move swiftly; especially, to move as if driven forward by something. [1913 Webster]

The first nautilus that scudded upon the glassy surface of warm primeval oceans. --I. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

The wind was high; the vast white clouds scudded over the blue heaven. --Beaconsfield. [1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) To be driven swiftly, or to run, before a gale, with little or no sail spread. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Scud — (sk[u^]d), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scudded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scudding}.] [Dan. skyde to shoot, shove, push, akin to skud shot, gunshot, a shoot, young bough, and to E. shoot. [root]159. See {Shoot}.] 1. To move swiftly; especially, to move as if… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scudding — Scud Scud (sk[u^]d), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scudded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scudding}.] [Dan. skyde to shoot, shove, push, akin to skud shot, gunshot, a shoot, young bough, and to E. shoot. [root]159. See {Shoot}.] 1. To move swiftly; especially, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scud — scud1 /skud/, v., scudded, scudding, n. v.i. 1. to run or move quickly or hurriedly. 2. Naut. to run before a gale with little or no sail set. 3. Archery. (of an arrow) to fly too high and wide of the mark. n. 4. the act of scudding. 5. clouds,… …   Universalium

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  • scud — I. intransitive verb (scudded; scudding) Etymology: perhaps from Middle Dutch schudden to shake Date: 1532 1. to move or run swiftly especially as if driven forward < clouds scudding across the sky > 2. to run before a gale II. noun …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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  • scud — I Scottish Vernacular Dictionary 1. verb: to strike a glancing blow, similar to skite and indeed skelp. During Gulf War I, the Iraqi military deployed SCUD missiles, which always sounded much less deadly to most Glaswegians. 2. noun:Scud, in the …   English dialects glossary

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