Scotched
Scotch Scotch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scotched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scotching}.] [Cf. Prov. E. scote a prop, and Walloon ascot a prop, ascoter to prop, F. accoter, also Armor. skoaz the shoulder, skoazia to shoulder up, to prop, to support, W. ysgwydd a shoulder, ysgwyddo to shoulder. Cf. {Scoat}.] [Written also {scoatch}, {scoat}.] To shoulder up; to prop or block with a wedge, chock, etc., as a wheel, to prevent its rolling or slipping. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • scotched — skÉ‘tʃ / skÉ’tʃ n. wedge or wooden block used to prevent a wagon from rolling on a slope v. injure, wound; cut, slash; destroy, put an end to; place a wedge or wooden block under a wheel to prevent rolling …   English contemporary dictionary

  • scotched — past of scotch …   Useful english dictionary

  • Scotched English — is standard English that has been changed to make it look like Scots. This can come about in two or three ways:It might just be an outcome of the fact that most native Scots speakers have only ever been taught how to write (standard) English and… …   Wikipedia

  • Scotched in Scotland — Infobox Film name = Scotched in Scotland caption = director = Jules White writer = Elwood Ullman Jack White starring = Moe Howard Larry Fine Shemp Howard Christine McIntyre Herbert Evans George Pembroke Philip Van Zandt cinematography = Ray Cory… …   Wikipedia

  • Scotched collops — Scotch Scotch, v. t. [Probably the same word as scutch; cf. Norw. skoka, skoko, a swingle for flax; perhaps akin to E. shake.] To cut superficially; to wound; to score. [1913 Webster] We have scotched the snake, not killed it. Shak. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scotch — UK [skɒtʃ] / US [skɑtʃ] verb [transitive] Word forms scotch : present tense I/you/we/they scotch he/she/it scotches present participle scotching past tense scotched past participle scotched to stop something from continuing before it has a chance …   English dictionary

  • Scotch — Scotch, v. t. [Probably the same word as scutch; cf. Norw. skoka, skoko, a swingle for flax; perhaps akin to E. shake.] To cut superficially; to wound; to score. [1913 Webster] We have scotched the snake, not killed it. Shak. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scotch collops — Scotch Scotch, v. t. [Probably the same word as scutch; cf. Norw. skoka, skoko, a swingle for flax; perhaps akin to E. shake.] To cut superficially; to wound; to score. [1913 Webster] We have scotched the snake, not killed it. Shak. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scotcht collops — Scotch Scotch, v. t. [Probably the same word as scutch; cf. Norw. skoka, skoko, a swingle for flax; perhaps akin to E. shake.] To cut superficially; to wound; to score. [1913 Webster] We have scotched the snake, not killed it. Shak. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scotch — I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English scocchen to gash, from Anglo French escocher, eschocher to pierce Date: 15th century 1. archaic cut, gash, score; also wound < we have scotched the snake, not killed it Shakespeare > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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