Scope Scope, n. [It. scopo, L. scopos a mark, aim, Gr. skopo`s, a watcher, mark, aim; akin to ?, ? to view, and perh. to E. spy. Cf. {Skeptic}, {Bishop}.] 1. That at which one aims; the thing or end to which the mind directs its view; that which is purposed to be reached or accomplished; hence, ultimate design, aim, or purpose; intention; drift; object. ``Shooting wide, do miss the marked scope.'' --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Your scope is as mine own, So to enforce or qualify the laws As to your soul seems good. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The scope of all their pleading against man's authority, is to overthrow such laws and constitutions in the church. --Hooker. [1913 Webster]

2. Room or opportunity for free outlook or aim; space for action; amplitude of opportunity; free course or vent; liberty; range of view, intent, or action. [1913 Webster]

Give him line and scope. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

In the fate and fortunes of the human race, scope is given to the operation of laws which man must always fail to discern the reasons of. --I. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

Excuse me if I have given too much scope to the reflections which have arisen in my mind. --Burke. [1913 Webster]

An intellectual cultivation of no moderate depth or scope. --Hawthorne. [1913 Webster]

3. Extended area. [Obs.] ``The scopes of land granted to the first adventurers.'' --Sir J. Davies. [1913 Webster]

4. Length; extent; sweep; as, scope of cable. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • scope — scope·less; seis·mo·scope; sig·moid·o·scope; ski·a·scope; snip·er·scope; snoop·er·scope; spec·tro·he·li·o·scope; spec·tro·scope; spin·thar·i·scope; stat·i·scope; stato·scope; stau·ro·scope; stereo·scope; stro·bo·scope; syn·chron·o·scope;… …   English syllables

  • Scope — or Scopes may refer to: * Scope (programming), the range in which a variable can be referenced * Scope (mouthwash), a mouthwash brand by Procter Gamble * SCOPE (TV series) * Scope (charity), a British charity that supports people with cerebral… …   Wikipedia

  • -scope — scope, scopie ♦ Éléments, du gr. skopos, skopia, de skopein « examiner, observer ». scope, scopie, scopique. éléments, du gr. skopos et skopia, de skopein, regarder, observer . ⇒ SCOPE, SCOPIE, élém. formants I. Scope. Élém. tiré du gr. ou tiré… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • scope — UK US /skəʊp/ noun [U] ► the range of things that an activity, company, law, etc. deals with: »large/ambitious in scope beyond/outside the scope of sth »He involved himself in affairs beyond the scope of his job. within the scope of sth »To come… …   Financial and business terms

  • Scope — steht für: den Sichtbarkeitsbereich einer Variable in der Programmierung, siehe Variable (Programmierung) Bereich, Ziel, Umfang im Projektmanagement, siehe Scope Management eine DSP basierte Musikplattform von Creamware, siehe Scope… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • scope — I noun ambit, amplitude, area, boundary, bounds, circle, circuit, compass, confines, demesne, expanse, extent, field, latitude, limit, locus, margin, orbit, purview, range, reach, realm, region, room, space, span, sphere, spread, stretch, sweep,… …   Law dictionary

  • Scope — est un super vilain créé par Marvel Comics. Il est apparu pour la première fois dans Marvel Comics Presents #49, en 1990. Origine Scope était un voyou travaillant pour des dealers. Il réussit à détecter Daredevil mais fut sévèrement battu par ce… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • -scope — [Gr. skopo s a watcher, spy. See {Scope}.] A combining form usually signifying an instrument for viewing (with the eye) or observing (in any way); as in microscope, telescope, altoscope, anemoscope. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scope — [ skɔp ] n. m. • 1968; de cinémascope ♦ Procédé de cinéma employant l anamorphose horizontale de l image au rapport 2. scope [skɔp] n. m. ÉTYM. 1968; de cinémascope. ❖ ♦ Anglic. Abréviation de cinémascope. || Un film en scope …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • -scope — word forming element indicating an instrument for seeing, from L.L. scopium, from Gk. skopion, from skopein to look at, examine (see SCOPE (Cf. scope) (n.1)) …   Etymology dictionary

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