Scoop wheel
Scoop Scoop, n. [OE. scope, of Scand. origin; cf. Sw. skopa, akin to D. schop a shovel, G. sch["u]ppe, and also to E. shove. See {Shovel}.] 1. A large ladle; a vessel with a long handle, used for dipping liquids; a utensil for bailing boats. [1913 Webster]

2. A deep shovel, or any similar implement for digging out and dipping or shoveling up anything; as, a flour scoop; the scoop of a dredging machine. [1913 Webster]

3. (Surg.) A spoon-shaped instrument, used in extracting certain substances or foreign bodies. [1913 Webster]

4. A place hollowed out; a basinlike cavity; a hollow. [1913 Webster]

Some had lain in the scoop of the rock. --J. R. Drake. [1913 Webster]

5. A sweep; a stroke; a swoop. [1913 Webster]

6. The act of scooping, or taking with a scoop or ladle; a motion with a scoop, as in dipping or shoveling. [1913 Webster]

7. a quantity sufficient to fill a scoop; -- used especially for ice cream, dispensed with an ice cream scoop; as, an ice cream cone with two scoops. [PJC]

8. an act of reporting (news, research results) before a rival; also called a {beat}. [Newspaper or laboratory cant] [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

9. news or information; as, what's the scoop on John's divorce?. [informal] [PJC]

{Scoop net}, a kind of hand net, used in fishing; also, a net for sweeping the bottom of a river.

{Scoop wheel}, a wheel for raising water, having scoops or buckets attached to its circumference; a tympanum. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Scoop — Scoop, n. [OE. scope, of Scand. origin; cf. Sw. skopa, akin to D. schop a shovel, G. sch[ u]ppe, and also to E. shove. See {Shovel}.] 1. A large ladle; a vessel with a long handle, used for dipping liquids; a utensil for bailing boats. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scoop net — Scoop Scoop, n. [OE. scope, of Scand. origin; cf. Sw. skopa, akin to D. schop a shovel, G. sch[ u]ppe, and also to E. shove. See {Shovel}.] 1. A large ladle; a vessel with a long handle, used for dipping liquids; a utensil for bailing boats.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scoop — [14] Scoop appears to go back ultimately to a prehistoric Germanic base *skap which originally denoted ‘chop or dig out’ (it was later extended metaphorically to ‘form’, and in that sense has given English shape). It had a variant form *skōp ,… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • scoop — [14] Scoop appears to go back ultimately to a prehistoric Germanic base *skap which originally denoted ‘chop or dig out’ (it was later extended metaphorically to ‘form’, and in that sense has given English shape). It had a variant form *skōp ,… …   Word origins

  • Water wheel — This article is about the machine for converting energy of flowing or falling water. For paddle wheels used to propel watercraft, see paddle wheel ship. For wheels used solely to lift water, see Noria. For factories or industries driven by water… …   Wikipedia

  • Steering wheel — This article is about steering wheels in cars. For the use in vessels, see Steering wheel (ship). A modern road car s steering wheel (Alfa Romeo Giulietta (2010)) …   Wikipedia

  • salmon wheel — noun : a device for catching salmon in large quantities consisting of a large revolving wheel suspended in the water and turned by the current to which are attached scoop nets that catch the fish passing beneath * * * a trap for catching salmon,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Bicycle wheel — For the Marcel Duchamp installation, see Bicycle Wheel. The front wheel from a racing bicycle made using a Mavic rim …   Wikipedia

  • Four-wheel drive — This article is about the class of vehicle drivetrains. For other uses, see Four by four/Four wheel drive (disambiguation). All wheel drive redirects here. For the all wheel drive in motorcycles, see two wheel drive. The Jeep Wrangler is a 4WD… …   Wikipedia

  • Water scoop (hydropower) — A water scoop is a simple hydropower machine, i.e. a machine used to extract power from the flow of water. Unlike a water wheel it operates intermittent, like a seesaw: A container (bucket/cup) at the end of a lever is filled with water in the… …   Wikipedia

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