Sconced
Sconce Sconce, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sconced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sconcing}.] 1. To shut up in a sconce; to imprison; to insconce. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Immure him, sconce him, barricade him in 't. --Marston. [1913 Webster]

2. To mulct; to fine. [Obs.] --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • sconced — skÉ‘ns /skÉ’ns n. candleholder or lamp attached to a vertical surface; small separate fort used to defend a location or structure; skull, head; wit, intelligence; fine imposed upon a student for a minor infraction of the rules (Archaic) v.… …   English contemporary dictionary

  • sconce — sconce1 /skons/, n. 1. a bracket for candles or other lights, placed on a wall, mirror, picture frame, etc. 2. the hole or socket of a candlestick, for holding the candle. [1350 1400; ME sconce, sconse ( < OF esconce) < ML sconsa, aph. var. of… …   Universalium

  • sconce — sconce1 [skäns] n. [ME sconse, aphetic < OFr esconse, dark lantern < pp. of escondre, to hide < L abscondere: see ABSCOND] a bracket attached to a wall for holding a candle, candles, or the like sconce2 [skäns] n. [Du schans, fortress,… …   English World dictionary

  • Sconce — Sconce, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sconced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sconcing}.] 1. To shut up in a sconce; to imprison; to insconce. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Immure him, sconce him, barricade him in t. Marston. [1913 Webster] 2. To mulct; to fine. [Obs.] Milton …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sconcing — Sconce Sconce, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sconced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sconcing}.] 1. To shut up in a sconce; to imprison; to insconce. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Immure him, sconce him, barricade him in t. Marston. [1913 Webster] 2. To mulct; to fine. [Obs.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Oregon City Bridge — Crosses Willamette River Locale Oregon City to West Linn, Oregon, USA Maintained by …   Wikipedia

  • The Idler (1758–1760) — This article is about the 18th century series of essays. For other publications called The Idler, see The Idler (disambiguation). The Idler was a series of 103 essays, all but twelve of them by Samuel Johnson, published in the London weekly the… …   Wikipedia

  • Sconcing — is a tradition at University of Oxford of demanding that a person drink a tankard of ale or some other alcoholic beverage as a penalty for some breach of accepted etiquette. Originally the penalty would have been a simple monetary fine imposed… …   Wikipedia

  • double dactyls — ▪ literature also called  higgledy piggledy        a light verse form consisting of eight lines of two dactyls each, arranged in two stanzas (stanza). The first line of the poem must be a jingle, often “Higgledy piggledy” or “Jiggery pokery”; the …   Universalium

  • ensconced — en|sconced [ ın skanst ] adjective LITERARY in a place or situation that you feel satisfied with, especially a place or situation that you do not intend to leave or change …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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