Scathe
Scathe Scathe (sk[=a][th]; 277), Scath Scath (sk[a^]th; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scathed} (sk[=a][th]d or sk[a^]tht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Scathing} (sk[=a][th]"[i^]ng or sk[a^]th"-).] [Icel. ska[eth]a; akin to AS. scea[eth]an, sce[eth][eth]an, Dan. skade, Sw. skada, D. & G. schaden, OHG. scad[=o]n, Goth. ska[thorn]jan.] To do harm to; to injure; to damage; to waste; to destroy. [1913 Webster]

As when heaven's fire Hath scathed the forest oaks or mountain pines. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Strokes of calamity that scathe and scorch the soul. --W. Irving. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • scathe — scathe·ful; scathe·less; scathe; scathe·less·ly; …   English syllables

  • scathe — index damage, disable, harm (noun), harm (verb), lash (attack verbally), persecute Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • scathe — (v.) c.1200, from O.N. skaða to hurt, injure, from P.Gmc. *skath (Cf. O.E. sceaþian to hurt, injure, O.Fris. skethia, M.Du. scaden, Du. schaden, O.H.G. scadon, Ger. schaden, Goth. scaþjan to injure, damage ), from PIE root *sket …   Etymology dictionary

  • scathe — [skāth] vt. scathed, scathing [ME scathen < ON skatha < skathi, harm, akin to Ger schaden, to harm < IE base * skēth , to injure > Gr (a)skēthēs, (un)harmed] 1. Now Chiefly Dial. a) to injure b) to wither; sear 2. to denounce fierce …   English World dictionary

  • scathe — Scath Scath (sk[a^]th; 277), n. [Icel. ska[eth]i; akin to Dan. skade, Sw. skada, AS. scea[eth]a, sca[eth]a, foe, injurer, OS. ska[eth]o, D. schade, harm, injury, OHG. scade, G. schade, schaden; cf. Gr. askhqh s unharmed. Cf. {Scathe}, v.] Harm;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scathe — [12] Scathe is now encountered virtually only in the negative form unscathed (first recorded in the 14th century), but originally it was a verb in its own right, meaning ‘harm’. It was borrowed from Old Norse skatha, which was descended from a… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • scathe — [12] Scathe is now encountered virtually only in the negative form unscathed (first recorded in the 14th century), but originally it was a verb in its own right, meaning ‘harm’. It was borrowed from Old Norse skatha, which was descended from a… …   Word origins

  • scathe — v. & n. v.tr. 1 poet. injure esp. by blasting or withering. 2 (as scathing adj.) witheringly scornful (scathing sarcasm). 3 (with neg.) do the least harm to (shall not be scathed) (cf. UNSCATHED). n. (usu. with neg.) archaic harm; injury (without …   Useful english dictionary

  • scathe — I. noun Etymology: Middle English skathe, from Old Norse skathi; akin to Old English sceatha injury, Greek askēthēs unharmed Date: 13th century harm, injury • scatheless adjective II. transitive verb (scathed; scathing …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • scathe — scatheless, adj. scathelessly, adv. /skaydh/, v., scathed, scathing, n. v.t. 1. to attack with severe criticism. 2. to hurt, harm, or injure, as by scorching. n. 3. hurt, harm, or injury. [bef. 1000; (n.) ME scath(e), scade, schath(e) < ON skathi …   Universalium

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