Scarcest
Scarce Scarce (sk[^a]rs), a. [Compar. {Scarcer} (sk[^a]r"s[~e]r); superl. {Scarcest}.] [OE. scars, OF. escars, eschars, LL. scarpsus, excarpsus, for L. excerptus, p. p. of excerpere to pick out, and hence to contract, to shorten; ex (see {Ex-}) + carpere. See {Carpet}, and cf. {Excerp}.] 1. Not plentiful or abundant; in small quantity in proportion to the demand; not easily to be procured; rare; uncommon. [1913 Webster]

You tell him silver is scarcer now in England, and therefore risen one fifth in value. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

The scarcest of all is a Pescennius Niger on a medallion well preserved. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

2. Scantily supplied (with); deficient (in); -- with of. [Obs.] ``A region scarce of prey.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. Sparing; frugal; parsimonious; stingy. [Obs.] ``Too scarce ne too sparing.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

{To make one's self scarce}, to decamp; to depart. [Slang] [1913 Webster]

Syn: Rare; infrequent; deficient. See {Rare}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • scarcest — skers /skeÉ™s adj. rare, not abundant, in short supply adv. barely, hardly, scarcely …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Scarce — (sk[^a]rs), a. [Compar. {Scarcer} (sk[^a]r s[ e]r); superl. {Scarcest}.] [OE. scars, OF. escars, eschars, LL. scarpsus, excarpsus, for L. excerptus, p. p. of excerpere to pick out, and hence to contract, to shorten; ex (see {Ex }) + carpere. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scarcer — Scarce Scarce (sk[^a]rs), a. [Compar. {Scarcer} (sk[^a]r s[ e]r); superl. {Scarcest}.] [OE. scars, OF. escars, eschars, LL. scarpsus, excarpsus, for L. excerptus, p. p. of excerpere to pick out, and hence to contract, to shorten; ex (see {Ex }) + …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To make one's self scarce — Scarce Scarce (sk[^a]rs), a. [Compar. {Scarcer} (sk[^a]r s[ e]r); superl. {Scarcest}.] [OE. scars, OF. escars, eschars, LL. scarpsus, excarpsus, for L. excerptus, p. p. of excerpere to pick out, and hence to contract, to shorten; ex (see {Ex }) + …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • neptune — /nep toohn, tyoohn/, n. any whelk of the genus Neptunea, esp. N. decemcostata, common along the eastern coast of North America and having a shell with seven to ten raised reddish brown spiral ridges on a pale beige or yellow background. [ < NL… …   Universalium

  • Neptune — /nep toohn, tyoohn/, n. 1. the ancient Roman god of the sea, identified with the Greek god Poseidon. 2. the sea or ocean: Neptune s mighty roar. 3. Astron. the planet eighth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 30,200 mi.… …   Universalium

  • scarce — I UK [skeə(r)s] / US [skers] adjective Word forms scarce : adjective scarce comparative scarcer superlative scarcest * if something is scarce, there is not very much of it Fresh water and medicines were scarce in the disaster area. scarce natural …   English dictionary

  • scarce — I. adjective (scarcer; scarcest) Etymology: Middle English scars, from Anglo French eschars, escars narrow, stingy, deficient, from Vulgar Latin *excarpsus, literally, plucked out, past participle of Latin excerpere to pluck out more at excerpt… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Ralph Nader — Nader speaking at BYU s Alternate Commencement Personal details …   Wikipedia

  • Congestion pricing — Typical traffic congestion in an urban freeway. Shown here I 80 Eastshore Freeway, Berkeley, United States …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”