Scanting
Scant Scant, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scanted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scanting}.] 1. To limit; to straiten; to treat illiberally; to stint; as, to scant one in provisions; to scant ourselves in the use of necessaries. [1913 Webster]

Where a man hath a great living laid together and where he is scanted. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

I am scanted in the pleasure of dwelling on your actions. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To cut short; to make small, narrow, or scanty; to curtail. ``Scant not my cups.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Scant — Scant, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scanted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scanting}.] 1. To limit; to straiten; to treat illiberally; to stint; as, to scant one in provisions; to scant ourselves in the use of necessaries. [1913 Webster] Where a man hath a great… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scanted — Scant Scant, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scanted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scanting}.] 1. To limit; to straiten; to treat illiberally; to stint; as, to scant one in provisions; to scant ourselves in the use of necessaries. [1913 Webster] Where a man hath a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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