Scabbard
Scabbard Scab"bard, v. t. To put in a scabbard. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:
(of a sword or a dagger),


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Scabbard — Scab bard, n. [OE. scaubert, scauberk, OF. escaubers, escauberz, pl., scabbards, probably of German or Scan. origin; cf. Icel. sk[=a]lpr scabbard, and G. bergen to conceal. Cf. {Hauberk}.] The case in which the blade of a sword, dagger, etc., is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scabbard — [skab′ərd] n. [ME scabarde, earlier scauberc < Anglo Fr escaubers (pl.) < ? OHG scar, sword, cutting tool (akin to SHEAR) + bergan, to hide, protect: see BURY] a sheath or case to hold the blade of a sword, dagger, etc.: see SWORD vt. to… …   English World dictionary

  • scabbard — (n.) c.1300, from Anglo Fr. *escauberc sheath, vagina (13c.), probably from Frankish *skar blade (Cf. O.H.G. scar scissors, blade, sword ) + *berg protect (Cf. O.H.G. bergan to protect ) …   Etymology dictionary

  • scabbard — ► NOUN 1) a sheath for the blade of a sword or dagger. 2) a sheath for a gun or other weapon or tool. ORIGIN Old French escalberc …   English terms dictionary

  • Scabbard — An elaborate Celtic scabbard of 0 200 AD, in two colours of bronze A scabbard is a sheath for holding a sword, knife, or other large blade. Scabbards have been made of many materials over the millennia, including leather, wood, and metals such as …   Wikipedia

  • scabbard — [13] English acquired scabbard from Anglo Norman escaubers. This appears to have been a compound formed from Old High German scār, which usually meant ‘scissors’ but was also used for ‘sword’ (it came from the same base that produced English… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • scabbard — UK [ˈskæbə(r)d] / US [ˈskæbərd] noun [countable] Word forms scabbard : singular scabbard plural scabbards a cover for the blade of a sword or dagger …   English dictionary

  • scabbard — [13] English acquired scabbard from Anglo Norman escaubers. This appears to have been a compound formed from Old High German scār, which usually meant ‘scissors’ but was also used for ‘sword’ (it came from the same base that produced English… …   Word origins

  • scabbard — n. 1 hist. a sheath for a sword, bayonet, etc. 2 US a sheath for a revolver etc. Phrases and idioms: scabbard fish any of various silvery white marine fish shaped like a sword scabbard, esp. Lepidopus caudatus. Etymology: ME sca(u)berc etc. f. AF …   Useful english dictionary

  • scabbard — noun Etymology: Middle English scauberc, scaubert, from Anglo French escalberc Date: 13th century a sheath for a sword, dagger, or bayonet • scabbard transitive verb …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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