battledoor
battledoor at"tle*door`, n. [OE. batyldour. A corrupted form of uncertain origin; cf. Sp. batallador a great combatant, he who has fought many battles, Pg. batalhador, Pr. batalhador, warrior, soldier, fr. L. battalia; or cf. Pr. batedor batlet, fr. batre to beat, fr. L. batuere. See {Battle}, n.] 1. An instrument, with a handle and a flat part covered with parchment or crossed with catgut, used to strike a shuttlecock in play; also, the play of battledoor and shuttlecock. [Also spelled {battledore}.] [1913 Webster]

2. [OE. battleder.] A child's hornbook. [Obs.] --Halliwell. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • battledore — battledoor at tle*door , n. [OE. batyldour. A corrupted form of uncertain origin; cf. Sp. batallador a great combatant, he who has fought many battles, Pg. batalhador, Pr. batalhador, warrior, soldier, fr. L. battalia; or cf. Pr. batedor batlet …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • battledore — at tle*dore n. same as {battledoor}. Syn: battledore and shuttlecock. [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Shuttlecock — Shut tle*cock , n. A cork stuck with feathers, which is to be struck by a battledoor in play; also, the play itself. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • spathulate — Spatulate Spat u*late, a. [NL. spatulatus.] (Nat. Hist.) Shaped like spatula, or like a battledoor, being roundish, with a long, narrow, linear base. [Also written {spathulate}.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spatulate — Spat u*late, a. [NL. spatulatus.] (Nat. Hist.) Shaped like spatula, or like a battledoor, being roundish, with a long, narrow, linear base. [Also written {spathulate}.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Terminology for Asteraceae — NOTOC accrescent *Growing larger after flowering.1913] achene *achene *A small, dry, indehiscent fruit, containing a single seed, as in the buttercup; called a naked seed by the earlier botanists. *small dry indehiscent fruit with the seed… …   Wikipedia

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