Satchel
Satchel Satch"el . [OF. sachel, fr. L. saccellus, dim. of saccus. See {Sack} a bag.] A little sack or bag for carrying papers, books, or small articles of wearing apparel; a hand bag. [Spelled also {sachel}.] [1913 Webster]

The whining schoolboy with his satchel. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Satchel — may refer to the following:* Satchel (bag), a carrying bag such as for school books ** Satchel charge, an explosive device typically carried in such a container ** Loculus (satchel), a Roman Legionary s satchel * Satchel Paige, a baseball pitcher …   Wikipedia

  • satchel — small bag, mid 14c., from O.Fr. sachel, from L.L. saccellum money bag, purse, dim. of L. sacculus, dim. of saccus bag (see SACK (Cf. sack) (n.1)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • satchel — A canvas bag, with a large flap and shoulder strap, used by a city carrier to hold mail for delivery on a route. It is not used on a completely motorized route or mounted route …   Glossary of postal terms

  • satchel — [n] small bag attaché, backpack, briefcase, carryall, carry on, duffel bag, garment bag, handbag, haversack, knapsack, overnight bag, pack, pouch, rucksack, saddlebag, suitcase, tote, travel bag; concepts 339,450,494 …   New thesaurus

  • satchel — ► NOUN ▪ a shoulder bag with a long strap, used especially for school books. ORIGIN Old French sachel, from Latin saccellus small bag …   English terms dictionary

  • satchel — [sach′əl] n. [ME sachel < OFr < L saccellus, dim. of saccus, a bag, SACK1] a small bag for carrying clothes, books, etc., sometimes having a shoulder strap …   English World dictionary

  • Satchel — This unusual and interesting name is of Norman French origin, and is a metonymic occupational surname for a maker of small bags, satchels. The name was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066 in the Old French form sachel , a… …   Surnames reference

  • satchel — [14] A satchel is etymologically a ‘small sack’ or bag. The word comes via Old French sachel from Latin saccellus, a diminutive form of saccus ‘bag’ (source of English sack). Its specific application to a ‘bag for carrying school books’ emerged… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • satchel — UK [ˈsætʃ(ə)l] / US [ˈsætʃəl] noun [countable] Word forms satchel : singular satchel plural satchels a small strong bag for carrying school books that is made of thick cloth or leather and has a long handle that goes over your shoulder …   English dictionary

  • satchel — [14] A satchel is etymologically a ‘small sack’ or bag. The word comes via Old French sachel from Latin saccellus, a diminutive form of saccus ‘bag’ (source of English sack). Its specific application to a ‘bag for carrying school books’ emerged… …   Word origins

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