Sack
Sack Sack, n. [OE. sak, sek, AS. sacc, s[ae]cc, L. saccus, Gr. sa`kkos from Heb. sak; cf. F. sac, from the Latin. Cf. {Sac}, {Satchel}, {Sack} to plunder.] 1. A bag for holding and carrying goods of any kind; a receptacle made of some kind of pliable material, as cloth, leather, and the like; a large pouch. [1913 Webster]

2. A measure of varying capacity, according to local usage and the substance. The American sack of salt is 215 pounds; the sack of wheat, two bushels. --McElrath. [1913 Webster]

3. [Perhaps a different word.] Originally, a loosely hanging garment for women, worn like a cloak about the shoulders, and serving as a decorative appendage to the gown; now, an outer garment with sleeves, worn by women; as, a dressing sack. [Written also {sacque}.] [1913 Webster]

4. A sack coat; a kind of coat worn by men, and extending from top to bottom without a cross seam. [1913 Webster]

5. (Biol.) See 2d {Sac}, 2. [1913 Webster]

6. Bed. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

{Sack bearer} (Zo["o]l.). See {Basket worm}, under {Basket}.

{Sack tree} (Bot.), an East Indian tree ({Antiaris saccidora}) which is cut into lengths, and made into sacks by turning the bark inside out, and leaving a slice of the wood for a bottom.

{To give the sack to} or {get the sack}, to discharge, or be discharged, from employment; to jilt, or be jilted. [Slang]

{To hit the sack}, to go to bed. [Slang] [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • Sack — Sack …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Sack — Sack: Das altgerm. Substantiv mhd., ahd. sac, got. sakkus (»Trauer , Bußgewand aus grobem Stoff«), niederl. zak, aengl. sacc > engl. sack (daneben aengl. sæcc, das die nord. Sippe von entsprechend schwed. säck lieferte) beruht auf einer sehr… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • sack — Ⅰ. sack [1] ► NOUN 1) a large bag made of a material such as hessian or thick paper, used for storing and carrying goods. 2) (the sack) informal dismissal from employment. 3) (the sack) informal bed. ► VERB informal …   English terms dictionary

  • SACK — ist eine Abkürzung für Selective Acknowledgment. TCP SACK ist eine Erweiterung des TCP Protokolls, die für bessere Performance bei Paketverlusten sorgt. SACK ermöglicht, dass bei Paketverlusten nicht der gesamte Inhalt des TCP Windows, sondern… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • sack — sack1 [sak] n. [ME sak < OE sacc, akin to OHG sac, Goth sakkus < early Gmc borrowing < L saccus, bag, in LL(Ec), sackcloth garment < Gr sakkos < Sem: cf. Heb sak, Akkadian shaqqu, sackcloth] 1. a) a bag, esp. a large one of coarse… …   English World dictionary

  • Sack — (s[a^]k), n. [OE. seck, F. sec dry (cf. Sp. seco, It. secco), from L. siccus dry, harsh; perhaps akin to Gr. ischno s, Skr. sikata sand, Ir. sesc dry, W. hysp. Cf. {Desiccate}.] A name formerly given to various dry Spanish wines. Sherris sack.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sack, v. t. 1. To put in a sack; to bag; as, to sack corn. [1913 Webster] Bolsters sacked in cloth, blue and crimson. L. Wallace. [1913 Webster] 2. To bear or carry in a sack upon the back or the shoulders. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sack, n. [F. sac plunder, pillage, originally, a pack, packet, booty packed up, fr. L. saccus. See {Sack} a bag.] The pillage or plunder, as of a town or city; the storm and plunder of a town; devastation; ravage. [1913 Webster] The town was… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sm std. (8. Jh.), mhd. sac m./n., ahd. sac, as. sakk Entlehnung. Wie gt. sakkus, ae. sacc früh entlehnt aus l. saccus, das über gr. sákkos auf assyr. šak̇k̇u Sack, Büßergewand zurückgeht. Auf eine Nebenform mit j führen anord. sekkr, ae. sæcc.… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • sack — The expressions to sack (someone) or to give (someone) the sack, meaning ‘to dismiss’ and to get the sack, meaning ‘to be dismissed’, are all still informal only despite a history of use since the 19c, possibly as a loan translation of the French …   Modern English usage

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