Rush Rush (r[u^]sh), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Rushed} (r[u^]sht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Rushing}.] [OE. ruschen; cf. AS. hryscan to make a noise, D. ruischen to rustle, G. rauschen, MHG. r[=u]schen to rush, to rustle, LG. rusken, OSw. ruska, Icel. & Sw. ruska to shake, Dan. ruske to shake, and E. rouse.] 1. To move forward with impetuosity, violence, and tumultuous rapidity or haste; as, armies rush to battle; waters rush down a precipice. [1913 Webster]

Like to an entered tide, they all rush by. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To enter into something with undue haste and eagerness, or without due deliberation and preparation; as, to rush business or speculation. [1913 Webster]

They . . . never think it to be a part of religion to rush into the office of princes and ministers. --Sprat. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

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  • rush — rush1 [rush] vi. [ME ruschen < Anglo Fr russher < MFr ruser, to repel, avert, orig., to mislead < OFr reuser: see RUSE] 1. a) to move or go swiftly or impetuously; dash b) to dash recklessly or rashly 2. to make a swift, sudden attack or …   English World dictionary

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