Rope's end
Rope Rope, n. [AS. r[=a]p; akin to D. reep, G. reif ring hoop, Icel. reip rope, Sw. rep, Dan. reb, reeb Goth. skaudaraip latchet.] 1. A large, stout cord, usually one not less than an inch in circumference, made of strands twisted or braided together. It differs from cord, line, and string, only in its size. See {Cordage}. [1913 Webster]

2. A row or string consisting of a number of things united, as by braiding, twining, etc.; as, a rope of onions. [1913 Webster]

3. pl. The small intestines; as, the ropes of birds. [1913 Webster]

{Rope ladder}, a ladder made of ropes.

{Rope mat}., a mat made of cordage, or strands of old rope.

{Rope of sand}, something of no cohession or fiber; a feeble union or tie; something not to be relied upon.

{Rope pump}, a pump in which a rapidly running endless rope raises water by the momentum communicated to the water by its adhesion to the rope.

{Rope transmission} (Mach.), a method of transmitting power, as between distant places, by means of endless ropes running over grooved pulleys.

{Rope's end}, a piece of rope; especially, one used as a lash in inflicting punishment.

{To give one rope}, to give one liberty or license; to let one go at will uncheked. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rope's-end — v. t. To punish with a rope s end. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rope's-end — ˈ ̷ ̷ˌ ̷ ̷ transitive verb Etymology: rope s end : to punish with a rope s end * * * rope sˈ end transitive verb (historical) To beat with a rope s end • • • Main Entry: ↑rope …   Useful english dictionary

  • rope's end — noun Etymology: Middle English roppys end, from roppys, ropes (gen. of rope) (I) + end, ende end 1. : a piece of rope especially for use as a lash for punishing 2. : a hangman s noose …   Useful english dictionary

  • rope's end — /ˈroʊps ɛnd/ (say rohps end) noun 1. History a short length of rope, often knotted, used to flog sailors. 2. a hangman s noose …   Australian English dictionary

  • rope's end — noun historical a short piece of rope used for flogging, especially on ships …   English new terms dictionary

  • at\ one's\ wit's\ end — • at one s wit s end • at wits end adj. phr. Having no ideas as to how to meet a difficulty or solve a problem; feeling puzzled after having used up all of your ideas or resources; not knowing what to do; puzzled. He had approached every friend… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • at one's wit's end — or[at wits end] {adj. phr.} Having no ideas as to how to meet a difficulty or solve a problem; feeling puzzled after having used up all of your ideas or resources; not knowing what to do; puzzled. * /He had approached every friend and… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • at one's wit's end — or[at wits end] {adj. phr.} Having no ideas as to how to meet a difficulty or solve a problem; feeling puzzled after having used up all of your ideas or resources; not knowing what to do; puzzled. * /He had approached every friend and… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Rope (play) — Rope is a 1929 British stage play by Patrick Hamilton. It is a thriller whose gruesome subject matter has been likened to the Grand Guignol style of theatre.It was first presented by the Repertory Players at the Strand Theatre, London, on 3 March …   Wikipedia

  • Rope — Rope, n. [AS. r[=a]p; akin to D. reep, G. reif ring hoop, Icel. reip rope, Sw. rep, Dan. reb, reeb Goth. skaudaraip latchet.] 1. A large, stout cord, usually one not less than an inch in circumference, made of strands twisted or braided together …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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