Roman law
Roman Ro"man, a. [L. Romanus, fr. Roma Rome: cf. F. romain. Cf. {Romaic}, {Romance}, {Romantic}.] 1. Of or pertaining to Rome, or the Roman people; like or characteristic of Rome, the Roman people, or things done by Romans; as, Roman fortitude; a Roman aqueduct; Roman art. [1913 Webster]

2. Of or pertaining to the Roman Catholic religion; professing that religion. [1913 Webster]

3. (Print.) (a) Upright; erect; -- said of the letters or kind of type ordinarily used, as distinguished from Italic characters. (b) Expressed in letters, not in figures, as I., IV., i., iv., etc.; -- said of numerals, as distinguished from the Arabic numerals, 1, 4, etc. [1913 Webster]

{Roman alum} (Chem.), a cubical potassium alum formerly obtained in large quantities from Italian alunite, and highly valued by dyers on account of its freedom from iron.

{Roman balance}, a form of balance nearly resembling the modern steelyard. See the Note under {Balance}, n., 1.

{Roman candle}, a kind of firework (generally held in the hand), characterized by the continued emission of shower of sparks, and the ejection, at intervals, of brilliant balls or stars of fire which are thrown upward as they become ignited.

{Roman Catholic}, of, pertaining to, or the religion of that church of which the pope is the spiritual head; as, a Roman Catholic priest; the Roman Catholic Church.

{Roman cement}, a cement having the property of hardening under water; a species of hydraulic cement.

{Roman law}. See under {Law}.

{Roman nose}, a nose somewhat aquiline.

{Roman ocher}, a deep, rich orange color, transparent and durable, used by artists. --Ure.

{Roman order} (Arch.), the composite order. See {Composite}, a., 2. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Roman law — Ro·man law n: the legal system of the ancient Romans that includes written and unwritten law, is based on the traditional law and legislation of the assemblies, resolves of the senate, enactments of the emperors, edicts of the praetors, writings… …   Law dictionary

  • Roman law — is the legal system of ancient Rome. As used in the West the term commonly refers to legal developments prior to the Roman/Byzantine state s adopting Greek as its official language in the 7th century. As such the development of Roman law covers… …   Wikipedia

  • Roman Law —     Roman Law     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Roman Law     In the following article this subject is briefly treated under the two heads of; I. Principles; II. History. Of these two divisions, I is subdivided into: A. Persons; B. Things; C. Actions …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Roman law — Law Law (l[add]), n. [OE. lawe, laghe, AS. lagu, from the root of E. lie: akin to OS. lag, Icel. l[ o]g, Sw. lag, Dan. lov; cf. L. lex, E. legal. A law is that which is laid, set, or fixed; like statute, fr. L. statuere to make to stand. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Roman law — n [U] law ↑civil law …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Roman law — n. the code of laws of ancient Rome: the basis for the modern legal system in many countries …   English World dictionary

  • Roman law — the system of jurisprudence elaborated by the ancient Romans, a strong and varied influence on the legal systems of many countries. [1650 60] * * * Law of the Roman Republic and Empire. Roman law has influenced the development of law in most of… …   Universalium

  • Roman law — In a general sense, comprehends all the laws which prevailed among the Romans, without regard to the time of their origin, including the collections of Justinian. In a more restricted sense, the Germans understand by this term merely the law of… …   Black's law dictionary

  • Roman law — noun the legal code of ancient Rome; codified under Justinian; the basis for many modern systems of civil law • Syn: ↑Justinian code, ↑civil law, ↑jus civile • Members of this Topic: ↑addiction, ↑novate, ↑stipulate …   Useful english dictionary

  • Roman law — That law which comprehends the laws which prevailed among the Romans, without regard to the time of their origin. The term is in a strict sense limited in its application to the laws of the Romans which prevailed until the compilation of the… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

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