Roaring forties

Roaring forties
Roar Roar, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Roared}; p. pr. & vvb. n. {Roaring}.] [OE. roren, raren, AS. r[=a]rian; akin to G. r["o]hten, OHG. r?r?n. [root]112.] 1. To cry with a full, loud, continued sound. Specifically: (a) To bellow, or utter a deep, loud cry, as a lion or other beast. [1913 Webster]

Roaring bulls he would him make to tame. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] (b) To cry loudly, as in pain, distress, or anger. [1913 Webster]

Sole on the barren sands, the suffering chief Roared out for anguish, and indulged his grief. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

He scorned to roar under the impressions of a finite anger. --South. [1913 Webster]

2. To make a loud, confused sound, as winds, waves, passing vehicles, a crowd of persons when shouting together, or the like. [1913 Webster]

The brazen throat of war had ceased to roar. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

How oft I crossed where carts and coaches roar. --Gay. [1913 Webster]

3. To be boisterous; to be disorderly. [1913 Webster]

It was a mad, roaring time, full of extravagance. --Bp. Burnet. [1913 Webster]

4. To laugh out loudly and continuously; as, the hearers roared at his jokes. [1913 Webster]

5. To make a loud noise in breathing, as horses having a certain disease. See {Roaring}, 2. [1913 Webster]

{Roaring boy}, a roaring, noisy fellow; -- name given, at the latter end Queen Elizabeth's reign, to the riotous fellows who raised disturbances in the street. ``Two roaring boys of Rome, that made all split.'' --Beau. & Fl.

{Roaring forties} (Naut.), a sailor's name for the stormy tract of ocean between 40[deg] and 50[deg] north latitude. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Roaring Forties — Album par Peter Hammill Sortie 1994 (Royaume Uni) Enregistrement 1994 (Royaume Uni) Genre Rock, Art rock, Rock progressif …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Roaring forties — Roar ing for ties (Naut.) The middle latitudes of the southern hemisphere. So called from the boisterous and prevailing westerly winds, which are especially strong in the South Indian Ocean up to 50[deg] S. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Roaring Forties —   [ rɔːrɪȖ fɔːtiz, englisch], Meteorologie: Brüllende Vierziger …   Universal-Lexikon

  • roaring forties — n. the stormy oceanic areas between 40° and 50° south latitude …   English World dictionary

  • Roaring Forties — Lage der Roaring Forties und der benachbarten Zonen als Bestandteil der Klipper Route Mit Roaring Forties (deutsch: Brüllende Vierziger oder Donnernde Vierziger) bezeichnet man die Region der Westwinddrift zwischen 40° und 50° südlicher Breite.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Roaring Forties — The Roaring Forties is a name given, especially by sailors, to the latitudes between 40°S and 50°S, so called because of the boisterous and prevailing westerly winds. Because there is less landmass to slow them down, the winds are especially… …   Wikipedia

  • roaring forties — either of two areas in the ocean between 40° and 50° N or S latitude, noted for high winds and rough seas. [1875 80] * * * ▪ ocean region       areas between latitudes 40° and 50° south in the Southern Hemisphere, where the prevailing winds blow… …   Universalium

  • Roaring Forties — Roa|ring For|ties [ rɔ:riŋ fɔ:tiz] die (Plur.) <aus gleichbed. engl. (the) roaring forties, eigtl. »brüllende Vierziger«> Bez. für beständige, starke bis stürmische, oft auch orkanartige Westwinde zwischen 40° u. 50° Breite auf der… …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • roaring forties — noun Usage: often capitalized R & F Date: 1883 a tract of ocean between roughly 40 and 50 degrees latitude south characterized by strong westerly winds and rough seas; also these winds …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • ROARING FORTIES —    a sailor s term for the Atlantic lying between 40° and 50°N. latitude, so called from the storms often encountered there …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”