Roaring boy
Roar Roar, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Roared}; p. pr. & vvb. n. {Roaring}.] [OE. roren, raren, AS. r[=a]rian; akin to G. r["o]hten, OHG. r?r?n. [root]112.] 1. To cry with a full, loud, continued sound. Specifically: (a) To bellow, or utter a deep, loud cry, as a lion or other beast. [1913 Webster]

Roaring bulls he would him make to tame. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] (b) To cry loudly, as in pain, distress, or anger. [1913 Webster]

Sole on the barren sands, the suffering chief Roared out for anguish, and indulged his grief. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

He scorned to roar under the impressions of a finite anger. --South. [1913 Webster]

2. To make a loud, confused sound, as winds, waves, passing vehicles, a crowd of persons when shouting together, or the like. [1913 Webster]

The brazen throat of war had ceased to roar. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

How oft I crossed where carts and coaches roar. --Gay. [1913 Webster]

3. To be boisterous; to be disorderly. [1913 Webster]

It was a mad, roaring time, full of extravagance. --Bp. Burnet. [1913 Webster]

4. To laugh out loudly and continuously; as, the hearers roared at his jokes. [1913 Webster]

5. To make a loud noise in breathing, as horses having a certain disease. See {Roaring}, 2. [1913 Webster]

{Roaring boy}, a roaring, noisy fellow; -- name given, at the latter end Queen Elizabeth's reign, to the riotous fellows who raised disturbances in the street. ``Two roaring boys of Rome, that made all split.'' --Beau. & Fl.

{Roaring forties} (Naut.), a sailor's name for the stormy tract of ocean between 40[deg] and 50[deg] north latitude. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • roaring boy — noun or roaring lad : a noisy bullying street roisterer of Elizabethan and Jacobean England intimidating passersby (as if to commit robbery) called also circling boy * * * roaring boy noun (obsolete) A boisterous bullying reveller, swaggerer or… …   Useful english dictionary

  • roaring boy — noun Date: circa 1590 a noisy street bully especially of Elizabethan and Jacobean England who intimidated passersby …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Roaring — Roar Roar, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Roared}; p. pr. & vvb. n. {Roaring}.] [OE. roren, raren, AS. r[=a]rian; akin to G. r[ o]hten, OHG. r?r?n. [root]112.] 1. To cry with a full, loud, continued sound. Specifically: (a) To bellow, or utter a deep, loud …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Roaring forties — Roar Roar, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Roared}; p. pr. & vvb. n. {Roaring}.] [OE. roren, raren, AS. r[=a]rian; akin to G. r[ o]hten, OHG. r?r?n. [root]112.] 1. To cry with a full, loud, continued sound. Specifically: (a) To bellow, or utter a deep, loud …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • roaring lad — noun see roaring boy …   Useful english dictionary

  • Roaring Jack — is an Australian Celtic punk/Folk punk band of the 1980s and 1990s. The band formed in 1985 and played their first shows in Sydney in 1986. Original members were Alistair Hulett (acoustic guitar and vocals), Dave Williams (bass), Steve Thompson… …   Wikipedia

  • Roaring Days — Infobox Album | Name = Roaring Days Type = Album Artist = Weddings Parties Anything Released = 1988 Recorded = Genre = Rock / Folk rock Length = Label = WEA Records Producer = Alan Thorne Reviews = *Allmusic Rating|4.5|5… …   Wikipedia

  • The Roaring Girl — is a Jacobean stage play, a comedy written by Thomas Middleton and Thomas Dekker ca. 1607 10.The play was first published in quarto in 1611, printed by Nicholas Okes for the bookseller Thomas Archer. The title page of the first edition states… …   Wikipedia

  • circling boy — noun see roaring boy …   Useful english dictionary

  • The Luck of Roaring Camp — is a short story by American author Bret Harte. It was first published in the August 1868 issue of the Overland Monthly and helped push Harte to international prominence.The story is about the birth of a baby boy in a 19th century gold… …   Wikipedia

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