Rhyme
Rhyme Rhyme, n. [OE. ryme, rime, AS. r[=i]m number; akin to OHG. r[=i]m number, succession, series, G. reim rhyme. The modern sense is due to the influence of F. rime, which is of German origin, and originally the same word.] [The Old English spelling {rime} is becoming again common. See Note under {Prime}.] 1. An expression of thought in numbers, measure, or verse; a composition in verse; a rhymed tale; poetry; harmony of language. ``Railing rhymes.'' --Daniel. [1913 Webster]

A ryme I learned long ago. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

He knew Himself to sing, and build the lofty rime. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. (Pros.) Correspondence of sound in the terminating words or syllables of two or more verses, one succeeding another immediately or at no great distance. The words or syllables so used must not begin with the same consonant, or if one begins with a vowel the other must begin with a consonant. The vowel sounds and accents must be the same, as also the sounds of the final consonants if there be any. [1913 Webster]

For rhyme with reason may dispense, And sound has right to govern sense. --Prior. [1913 Webster]

3. Verses, usually two, having this correspondence with each other; a couplet; a poem containing rhymes. [1913 Webster]

4. A word answering in sound to another word. [1913 Webster]

{Female rhyme}. See under {Female}.

{Male rhyme}. See under {Male}.

{Rhyme or reason}, sound or sense.

{Rhyme royal} (Pros.), a stanza of seven decasyllabic verses, of which the first and third, the second, fourth, and fifth, and the sixth and seventh rhyme. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • rhyme — [rīm] n. [ME rime < OFr < rimer, to rhyme, prob. < Frank * rim, row, series, akin to OE, OHG rim, series, number < IE * rei (> OIr rim, number) < base * are , to join, fit (> ART1, RATIO, RITE): form infl. by assoc. with L… …   English World dictionary

  • Rhyme — Rhyme, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Rhymed};p. pr. & vb. n. {Rhyming}.] [OE. rimen, rymen, AS. r[=i]man to count: cf. F. rimer to rhyme. See {Rhyme}, n.] 1. To make rhymes, or verses. Thou shalt no longer ryme. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] There marched the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rhyme — Rhyme, v. t. 1. To put into rhyme. Sir T. Wilson. [1913 Webster] 2. To influence by rhyme. [1913 Webster] Hearken to a verser, who may chance Rhyme thee to good. Herbert. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rhyme — [n] poetry in which lines end with like sounds alliteration, beat, cadence, couplet, doggerel, half rhyme, harmony, iambic pentameter, measure, meter, nursery rhyme, ode, poem, poesy, poetry, rhythm, rune, slant rhyme, song, tune, verse, vowel… …   New thesaurus

  • rhyme — ► NOUN 1) correspondence of sound between words or the endings of words, especially when used in poetry. 2) a short poem with rhyming lines. 3) rhyming poetry or verse. 4) a word with the same sound as another. ► VERB 1) (of a word, syllable, or… …   English terms dictionary

  • Rhyme — A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds in two or more words and is most often used in poetry and songs. The word rhyme may also refer to a short poem, such as a rhyming couplet or other brief rhyming poem such as nursery rhymes. Contents 1… …   Wikipedia

  • rhyme — rhymer, n. /ruym/, n., v., rhymed, rhyming. n. 1. identity in sound of some part, esp. the end, of words or lines of verse. 2. a word agreeing with another in terminal sound: Find is a rhyme for mind and womankind. 3. verse or poetry having… …   Universalium

  • rhyme — rhyme1 [raım] n [Date: 1100 1200; : Old French; Origin: rime, probably from Latin rhythmus; RHYTHM] 1.) a short poem or song, especially for children, using words that rhyme ▪ a collection of traditional rhymes with illustrations →↑nursery rhyme… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • rhyme — [[t]ra͟ɪm[/t]] rhymes, rhyming, rhymed 1) V RECIP ERG If one word rhymes with another or if two words rhyme, they have a very similar sound. Words that rhyme with each other are often used in poems. [V with n] June always rhymes with moon in old… …   English dictionary

  • rhyme — I UK [raɪm] / US noun Word forms rhyme : singular rhyme plural rhymes * 1) [countable] a short poem, often for children, that has lines ending in the same sound 2) a) [countable] a word that ends with the same sound as another word rhyme for: Can …   English dictionary

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