Respiting
Respite Res"pite, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Respited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Respiting}.] [OF. respiter, LL. respectare. See {Respite}, n.] To give or grant a respite to. Specifically: (a) To delay or postpone; to put off. (b) To keep back from execution; to reprieve. [1913 Webster]

Forty days longer we do respite you. --Shak. [1913 Webster] (c) To relieve by a pause or interval of rest. ``To respite his day labor with repast.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • respiting — res·pite || respaɪt ,pɪt n. temporary delay, cessation, intermission; reprieve, suspension of an execution, delay or cancellation of a death sentence v. suspend temporarily, grant an intermission; suspend an execution, delay or cancel a death… …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Respite — Res pite, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Respited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Respiting}.] [OF. respiter, LL. respectare. See {Respite}, n.] To give or grant a respite to. Specifically: (a) To delay or postpone; to put off. (b) To keep back from execution; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Respited — Respite Res pite, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Respited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Respiting}.] [OF. respiter, LL. respectare. See {Respite}, n.] To give or grant a respite to. Specifically: (a) To delay or postpone; to put off. (b) To keep back from execution;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • respite — I. noun Etymology: Middle English respit, from Anglo French, from Medieval Latin respectus, from Latin, act of looking back more at respect Date: 13th century 1. a period of temporary delay 2. an interval of rest or relief II. transitive verb… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • List of Acts of Parliament of the English Parliament to 1601 — This is a list of Acts of Parliament of the English Parliament during that body s existence prior to the Act of Union of 1707. For legislation passed after 1707 see List of Acts of Parliament of the United Kingdom Parliament.The numbers after the …   Wikipedia

  • Contramandatio placiti — In ancient English law books, the phrase contramandatio placiti signifies a respiting, or giving the defendant more time to answer; or, an imparlance, or countermanding of what was formerly ordered.[1] References ^  This article incorporates …   Wikipedia

  • respite — /res pit/, n., v., respited, respiting. n. 1. a delay or cessation for a time, esp. of anything distressing or trying; an interval of relief: to toil without respite. 2. temporary suspension of the execution of a person condemned to death;… …   Universalium

  • respite — /ˈrɛspət / (say respuht), /ˈrɛspaɪt / (say respuyt), /rəˈspaɪt/ (say ruh spuyt) noun 1. a delay or cessation for a time, especially of anything distressing or trying; an interval of relief: to toil without respite. 2. temporary suspension of the… …   Australian English dictionary

  • contramandatio — /kontramaendeysh(iy)ow/ A countermanding. Contramandatio placiti, in old English law, was the respiting of a defendant, or giving him further time to answer, by countermanding the day fixed for him to plead, and appointing a new day; a sort of… …   Black's law dictionary

  • de homagio respectuando — /diy hameyjiyow raspektyuwaendow/ A writ for respiting or postponing homage …   Black's law dictionary

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